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https://www.carsdirect.com/automotive-news/almost-no-cars-can-attain-highest-iihs-safety-rating-without-options
Safety features have become a key differentiator among today's vehicles. Automakers tout safety ratings from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, or IIHS, like badges of honor. However, shoppers may not know that most cars on the market today can't achieve the agency's highest rating without pricey options. At the moment, the group's top rating is "Top Safety Pick+". Somewhat confusingly, the agency still uses a separate designation called "Top Safety Pick" even though it's no longer the highest score. The difference is that TSP+ has a higher standard for headlights and the agency's front & passenger-side small overlap crash tests. Interestingly, our analysis of the latest test ratings found that virtually none of the group's TSP+ vehicles can achieve the score without optional equipment.


We reached out to IIHS spokesperson Russ Rader, who confirmed that there are in fact just two vehicles able to achieve a TSP+ score without options: the Honda Insight and Genesis G90. The Insight starts at $23,850 but is largely a niche model. The G90 sells in small numbers and starts above $70,000. We suspect most consumers would find all of this incredibly confusing. Quirks such as these will mean that shoppers will have to do their diligence by reading any and all fine print, looking for language like "as tested" or "with optional equipment" in advertisements.
The Honda Insight is only 1 of 2 vehicles that come standard with LED headlights without having to spend more plus provides enough visibility at night to get the Top Safety Pick+ rating.
 

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As we blind everyone else not the road, leaving them having driven off the road, collided with poles, swerved into ditches, etc. :)

But, it is impressive! Only 1 of 2.
 

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It is astonishing how many vehicles get top crash test results but fail to earn a Top Safety Pick+ rating due to lower headlight ratings. Many more only include the necessary automatic emergency braking systems and better headlights on top trim levels, sometimes requiring extra safety or tech packages on top of that. Consumers often don't realize that the actual trim level they purchase doesn't meet the IIHS requirements for a TSP award, let alone TSP+. Even if they do, it can be hard to find one that meets those requirements on a dealer's lot.

Designing a vehicle to be able to earn "Good" results in all the actual IIHS crash tests and a 5-star result in all of the NHTSA individual crash test ratings (not just the overall rating) is a very difficult and expensive engineering task. It seems like a major oversight to do that, and then save some money with marginal headlights.

The Insight LX and even EX are relative bargains for overall safety. With teen drivers, that was the big selling point for me. I do wonder why they left off Blind Spot warnings and Rear Cross Traffic Alerts when Accord EX and competitors like Prius LE and Ioniq SEL offer them. At least they could have added LaneWatch to the driver side.
 

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It is astonishing how many vehicles get top crash test results but fail to earn a Top Safety Pick+ rating due to lower headlight ratings. Many more only include the necessary automatic emergency braking systems and better headlights on top trim levels, sometimes requiring extra safety or tech packages on top of that. Consumers often don't realize that the actual trim level they purchase doesn't meet the IIHS requirements for a TSP award, let alone TSP+. Even if they do, it can be hard to find one that meets those requirements on a dealer's lot.

Designing a vehicle to be able to earn "Good" results in all the actual IIHS crash tests and a 5-star result in all of the NHTSA individual crash test ratings (not just the overall rating) is a very difficult and expensive engineering task. It seems like a major oversight to do that, and then save some money with marginal headlights.

The Insight LX and even EX are relative bargains for overall safety. With teen drivers, that was the big selling point for me. I do wonder why they left off Blind Spot warnings and Rear Cross Traffic Alerts when Accord EX and competitors like Prius LE and Ioniq SEL offer them. At least they could have added LaneWatch to the driver side.
I think Blind Spot Monitoring and Rear Cross Traffic Alert (same sensor device) were left off for one of the reasons you stated above: the addition wasn't needed for the Insight to earn top safety ratings. Also with the Insight being based on Civic platform/components AND since BSM/RCTA isn't an option for the Civic, Honda probably wasn't motivated to add it for the lower-sales-volume Insight.

That said, BSM/RCTA were also features that I REALLY wanted as well. I hope Honda makes it at least available as an accessory option in the future, if not included standard.
 

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Right[img= class=inlineimg]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img] I should have phrased that, "Honda why did you cheap out and not add BSM and RCTA even on higher trims...". I have a number of minor quirk complaints like this, though I still liked it best in the segment. Seriously, I really do wonder if sometimes they intentionally omit obvious things on new models not only for cost, but also so they have something to do at the refresh.
 

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Absolutely great news...to top off everything else this most stylish, and powerful hybrid has to offer. My insurance cost is VERY reasonable. The safety rating helps.

I love the headlights! They are angled low enough not to bother anyone. I don't get "flashed" by oncoming cars at night, so they don't have an issue...except when the automatic dimming headlights are slow to respond around angles and curves. In that situation, I just quickly switch to manual. I'm glad they put that quick disable feature in.

As far as BSM and whatnot, I think people are becoming FAR TOO DEPENDENT on some sensor telling them what they SHOULD BE LOOKING FOR. People use them as "replacements" for being lazy to JUST TAKE A LOOK. I see it on the road all the time. The sensor reacts AFTER THEY MOVE TOWARDS ANOTHER CAR. That is far too close to collision. I would prefer a left side Lane Watch camera in addition to the right side Lane Watch camera. Visual verification is far better, and the law.

Besides, most BSM systems run 24 GHz radar that drives people who use radar detectors NUTS. There is only a few "expensive" radar detectors that filter out "almost all" of the BSM radar, but Honda's and Mazda's are harder to filter, as they resemble CW signals similar to police radar. There is an FCC mandate for car manufacturers to move to 77 GHz, like the Insight uses in front, and that can't happen fast enough. Until then, Escort MAX (any of the series), and Radenso PRO-M are the only choice for best filtering. The Escort MAX II can be had for $250 at Costco (when they run them on sale), but the others are up around $500.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
It is astonishing how many vehicles get top crash test results but fail to earn a Top Safety Pick+ rating due to lower headlight ratings. Many more only include the necessary automatic emergency braking systems and better headlights on top trim levels, sometimes requiring extra safety or tech packages on top of that. Consumers often don't realize that the actual trim level they purchase doesn't meet the IIHS requirements for a TSP award, let alone TSP+. Even if they do, it can be hard to find one that meets those requirements on a dealer's lot.

Designing a vehicle to be able to earn "Good" results in all the actual IIHS crash tests and a 5-star result in all of the NHTSA individual crash test ratings (not just the overall rating) is a very difficult and expensive engineering task. It seems like a major oversight to do that, and then save some money with marginal headlights.

The Insight LX and even EX are relative bargains for overall safety. With teen drivers, that was the big selling point for me. I do wonder why they left off Blind Spot warnings and Rear Cross Traffic Alerts when Accord EX and competitors like Prius LE and Ioniq SEL offer them. At least they could have added LaneWatch to the driver side.
The Japanese 2019 Honda Insight actually have the Blind Spot warnings (not sure about the rear cross traffic alert) along with lots of other nice things we want like power folded side mirrors, sunglass holder, rear air vents, etc...


Honda mentioned the Insight in the US is targeted at young people with no families while the Insight in Japan is marketed as a luxury sports type car for people in their 40s-50s. We sort of got the essentials at a competitive price starting under 25k while the Japanese Insight is around 29k-34k. Honda also probably worried about the Insight cannibalizing 10th gen Accord Hybrid sales here so held back on some features. They don't have that problem over in Japan because only the previous 9th gen Accord Hybrid is being sold there.


As far as BSM and whatnot, I think people are becoming FAR TOO DEPENDENT on some sensor telling them what they SHOULD BE LOOKING FOR. People use them as "replacements" for being lazy to JUST TAKE A LOOK. I see it on the road all the time. The sensor reacts AFTER THEY MOVE TOWARDS ANOTHER CAR. That is far too close to collision. I would prefer a left side Lane Watch camera in addition to the right side Lane Watch camera. Visual verification is far better, and the law.
I got used to using the BSM on my ford fusion so it did take me awhile to adjust. I do agree it's best to familiarize doing these safety checks yourself instead of relying on tech so you don't forget when getting into a car without them or when the system fails on you. I still turn my head, check my blind-spots, and not totally rely on the rear camera when I reverse out.
 

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I find the BSM most effective on those few times when I'm trying to make a quick lane change, or when I just forget to look over my shoulder because I'm "sure" no one is there because I've been monitoring the traffic, but of course someone sneaks in anyway.
 

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My problem — and the reason I’d like a blind spot monitor — is that the rear and over-the-shoulder visibility in the Insight is poor, or fair, at best. I really like the Lane Watch camera, which overcomes the shoulder limitation, so my preference would be to have BOTH BSM and LW.

It's definitely the case that many drivers have become too dependent on the tech features — there was a relatively recent AAA survey that found most drivers don't know the limits of the systems and do rely on them excessively. It's ironic as the features are there to help safety, but may have worsened it.

OTOH, with reduced visibility (and the Insight's low front), those tech features have become essential aids. A front camera like the rear one showing how close one is to a parking bumper would be a great addition to the Insight.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OTOH, with reduced visibility (and the Insight's low front), those tech features have become essential aids. A front camera like the rear one showing how close one is to a parking bumper would be a great addition to the Insight.
A front camera would be nice plus night vision mode with animal detection.:grin:


 

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As we blind everyone else not the road, leaving them having driven off the road, collided with poles, swerved into ditches, etc. :)

But, it is impressive! Only 1 of 2.
Yeah I would like to oppose this opinion.. I was curious about how bright the lights were on my Insight so my fiancee and I traded cars at night (hers in an older 2010 Toyota Corolla >headlights are horrible comparatively speaking<)... She drove opposite down the road to me and I could tell my car had LED headlights - however they did not blind me like newer trucks and SUV's do.. They were not that bright at all honestly - only "whiter"..
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wish I had the money for a car of that nature (in a hybrid form).. But then again - our system is already irritating enough when it detects someone slowing down too fast and beeps at you to brake lol.
Expensive car, and just as expensive to fix. Audi makes money either way. :wink:
 

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The 2019 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid recently joined the ranks of the few vehicles to earn an IIHS Top Safety Pick "Plus" award on all trim levels with standard features.

Insight remains the only car for 2019 to accomplish this AND get 5-stars in every single NHTSA safety evaluation as well. (The 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid and Genesis G90 are still untested by the NHTSA).

Worthwhile to note that the 2018-2019 Camry gets the IIHS Top Safety Pick (or Plus) standard on all trim levels along with 5-star results in all NHTSA evaluations. 2019 Subaru Forester and Mazda CX-5 meet the IIHS Top Safety Pick standard as well, but miss out on the NHTSA standard with 4-star rollover ratings (like just about any compact or midsize SUV).

Some other vehicles miss out only due to putting "Marginal" or "Poor" rated headlights on lower trim levels, or by not having had the NHTSA expedite crash testing. This is a real shame for many luxury models in particular, especially when the ~$20K Insight LX can get top safety ratings across the board with standard features.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Insight benefited from Honda's decision to go LEDs only on all trims. It allowed them to design a headlight assembly specifically for LEDs instead of an afterthought for the highest trim. This probably made a difference during the IIHS headlight test and explains the different results on the Civic Touring trim (LED was rated Poor).
 

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The Japanese 2019 Honda Insight actually have the Blind Spot warnings (not sure about the rear cross traffic alert) along with lots of other nice things we want like power folded side mirrors, sunglass holder, rear air vents, etc...


Honda mentioned the Insight in the US is targeted at young people with no families while the Insight in Japan is marketed as a luxury sports type car for people in their 40s-50s. We sort of got the essentials at a competitive price starting under 25k while the Japanese Insight is around 29k-34k. Honda also probably worried about the Insight cannibalizing 10th gen Accord Hybrid sales here so held back on some features. They don't have that problem over in Japan because only the previous 9th gen Accord Hybrid is being sold there.



I got used to using the BSM on my ford fusion so it did take me awhile to adjust. I do agree it's best to familiarize doing these safety checks yourself instead of relying on tech so you don't forget when getting into a car without them or when the system fails on you. I still turn my head, check my blind-spots, and not totally rely on the rear camera when I reverse out.
Does this mean I can order the necessary parts off eBay Japane and retrofit? :smile:
 

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Does this mean I can order the necessary parts off eBay Japane and retrofit? :smile:
The Japanese Insight has power folding side mirrors so I'm not sure if that will complicate things a little but it's going to be an expensive import either way.
 

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Does this mean I can order the necessary parts off eBay Japane and retrofit? :smile:
There are Japanese parts for the Insight listed on eBay, but they are pricy and have different part numbers/description (plus language interpretation barrier)... you may want to consider using a part importer instead like @gremal did while looking for the Japanese chrome grille - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/258-honda-insight-features-equipment/2002-can-we-take-moment-appreciate-how-beautiful-japanese-insight-4.html Let us know if you crack the code too!
 

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The Tesla Model 3 is now just the second vehicle along with Insight to to get top IIHS and NHTSA ratings with all standard features on every version.

Insight had one blemish in IIHS testing, an "Acceptable" sub category rating for Pelvis/leg in the side impact test. The Model 3 had a single "Acceptable" sub category result in the Lower leg/foot in the small overlap passenger side test. It also had an Acceptable child LATCH ease of use rating.

Model 3 is slightly heavier, an advantage in frontal crashes with another vehicle. It also had a lower rollover risk rating in the NHTSA testing.

Pretty minor differences for two very safe compact cars.

The 2019 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid recently joined the ranks of the few vehicles to earn an IIHS Top Safety Pick "Plus" award on all trim levels with standard features.

Insight remains the only car for 2019 to accomplish this AND get 5-stars in every single NHTSA safety evaluation as well. (The 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid and Genesis G90 are still untested by the NHTSA).

Worthwhile to note that the 2018-2019 Camry gets the IIHS Top Safety Pick (or Plus) standard on all trim levels along with 5-star results in all NHTSA evaluations. 2019 Subaru Forester and Mazda CX-5 meet the IIHS Top Safety Pick standard as well, but miss out on the NHTSA standard with 4-star rollover ratings (like just about any compact or midsize SUV).

Some other vehicles miss out only due to putting "Marginal" or "Poor" rated headlights on lower trim levels, or by not having had the NHTSA expedite crash testing. This is a real shame for many luxury models in particular, especially when the ~$20K Insight LX can get top safety ratings across the board with standard features.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Having a IIHS TSP+ rating is also good for insurance rates. I'm paying under $100 per month for my auto insurance with the Insight.
 
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