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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Havent seen a lot on ceramic brakes for this car. I was planning on adding ceramic brakes when my current pads wear down, but was curious if there are any drawbacks to the hybrid braking system. I saw this post on the bridgestone site and it peaked my interest.

since both ceramic and copper can’t absorb as much heat as other types of materials, more of the heat generated by braking will pass through the brake pads and into the rest of the braking system.
Doubt it would lead to extra battery charge, but still curious. Has anyone had ceramic brakes installed and had any good/bad experiences?
 

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My car has almost 70,000 on it and the brakes are still barely worn.. I have never noticed any build up of brake dust on the front wheels (main advantage of ceramic brakes is less dust). I would just stick with the stock option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My car has almost 70,000 on it and the brakes are still barely worn.. I have never noticed any build up of brake dust on the front wheels (main advantage of ceramic brakes is less dust). I would just stick with the stock option.
These brakes do seem to last a long time due to paddle brakes, but Im thinking ceramic would last even longer.
 

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Not sure you'd see much benefit from ceramic brakes on an Insight. There is so little wear due to regen, that OEM pads will probably last for 100K+ miles. Per @Mobilcams comment, the lower use of friction brakes means things stay cleaner longer which also negates that ceramic benefit. With all that said, as long as they are direct fit, there would be no issue using ceramics. I'm not sure the cost would offer any significant benefits though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
100k miles on stock brake pads would be amazing. I also like that the wheels dont get too dirty and are super easy to clean due to the color/design. Decisions decisions 🤔
 

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These brakes do seem to last a long time due to paddle brakes, but Im thinking ceramic would last even longer.
To be honest, I don't use the paddles very much unless I am showing off in sport mode lol. The braking you are getting from pushing on the pedal will still give you the same regenerative braking you would get from the paddles - you just have to push harder than if you were using the paddles.. Paddles vs Pedal = same use of regen. It's sorta like sport mode with the throttle, it makes the brake Pedal response sharper with the use of the Paddels turned up.. Pedal Paddle (I can't get that out of my head now) :p
 

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You may get 100k from the brakes, but the work due on them may be pretty expensive by then. Keep in mind since the pads hit the rotors a lot less than a normal car (and then usually only at low speeds) many people have found (especially on electric vehicles) that the brake pads tend to rust apart on their mounting brackets. They also find the rotors to have a lot of rust problems and various other brake troubles can ensue from this lack of wear. Think about a car just sitting for a year or 2 without use and all the damage that happens from just the sitting. Some people like to take their Hybrids/Electric cars to quiet roads, pick up speed, and hit the brakes really hard to make sure the pads actually engage along with the regen system. The hope is to rub some of the rust build up that can occur on the rotors and such due to the lack of any real heavy or hard (higher speed slams) use of the physical brake system. I am considering taking my car to an outside garage and having the brakes looked over and lubed up. I really don't want to run into a $1000 brake job just because the car doesn't use it's physical brakes enough and the system rotted away due to disuse.

Any other opinions on this?
 

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I normally have one or two slightly aggressive stops here due to NJ drivers. Not too worried about rust build-up. I garage my car as well, so it's not subject to the elements.

I do agree that the friction brakes need to be used now and then to keep them shiny and new.
 

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100k miles on stock brake pads would be amazing. I also like that the wheels dont get too dirty and are super easy to clean due to the color/design. Decisions decisions 🤔
I got 162K on my 2010 prius and now going on 132K on my second set of brake pads. Regen really helps with brake pad life.
 

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You may get 100k from the brakes, but the work due on them may be pretty expensive by then. Keep in mind since the pads hit the rotors a lot less than a normal car (and then usually only at low speeds) many people have found (especially on electric vehicles) that the brake pads tend to rust apart on their mounting brackets. They also find the rotors to have a lot of rust problems and various other brake troubles can ensue from this lack of wear. Think about a car just sitting for a year or 2 without use and all the damage that happens from just the sitting. Some people like to take their Hybrids/Electric cars to quiet roads, pick up speed, and hit the brakes really hard to make sure the pads actually engage along with the regen system. The hope is to rub some of the rust build up that can occur on the rotors and such due to the lack of any real heavy or hard (higher speed slams) use of the physical brake system. I am considering taking my car to an outside garage and having the brakes looked over and lubed up. I really don't want to run into a $1000 brake job just because the car doesn't use it's physical brakes enough and the system rotted away due to disuse.

Any other opinions on this?
I've actually switched to neutral while at around 50 mph and did a few long and one aggressive stops. This is how I discovered one of my rotors is warped (probably torqued wrong at the dealership during rotation).. Even before doing this, rotors have stayed pretty clean (but I have also put almost 70,000 miles in two years on mine). My next service minder is calling for the brake fluid to be flushed. That service on a hybrid is most important in my opinion(it's just my opinion folks - not something written in stone). Since our brakes aren't used as much - the fluid hardly gets a good chance to heat up and boil any moisture that may be accumulating in the fluid..
 

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I got 162K on my 2010 prius and now going on 132K on my second set of brake pads. Regen really helps with brake pad life.
I had to do a serious brake job on my Prius' front brakes at about 140k. It was mostly due to lack of physical use which caused a lot of trouble with caliper freeze ups.
 

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I've actually switched to neutral while at around 50 mph and did a few long and one aggressive stops. This is how I discovered one of my rotors is warped (probably torqued wrong at the dealership during rotation).. Even before doing this, rotors have stayed pretty clean (but I have also put almost 70,000 miles in two years on mine). My next service minder is calling for the brake fluid to be flushed. That service on a hybrid is most important in my opinion(it's just my opinion folks - not something written in stone). Since our brakes aren't used as much - the fluid hardly gets a good chance to heat up and boil any moisture that may be accumulating in the fluid..
Yeah it's recommended to change your brake fluid every 2 years, but with your mileage I'm wondering if you should have done it every 18 months. :unsure:
 

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Not sure you'd see much benefit from ceramic brakes on an Insight. There is so little wear due to regen, that OEM pads will probably last for 100K+ miles. Per @Mobilcams comment, the lower use of friction brakes means things stay cleaner longer which also negates that ceramic benefit. With all that said, as long as they are direct fit, there would be no issue using ceramics. I'm not sure the cost would offer any significant benefits though.
I just would be cautious of the additional weight for any changes to your car. I know it's small or negligible. Cumulative weight gains will impact your overall mpg efficiency. I have a Touring, love it, but it does require a lot of attention to keep mpg > 45 mpg. I wondered why the seats were so limited and the reason being was the weight. Honda has been very careful on each model how options impact fuel efficiency the primary driver for purchasing a hybrid.
 

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Yeah it's recommended to change your brake fluid every 2 years, but with your mileage I'm wondering if you should have done it every 18 months. :unsure:
Nah, most of the mileage was highway driving, not much brake use going on there.. If it were in the city driving then maybe?? Who knows - I just hope it doesn't cost me one of my children to have it done.. I will NOT be messing with this brake system. It's way way way too complex.
 

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Yeah it's recommended to change your brake fluid every 2 years, but with your mileage I'm wondering if you should have done it every 18 months. :unsure:
Hmm, I changed the brake fluid on my truck after 13 years and only because one of the brake lines rusted through. I am guessing I missed that recommended change interval by a tiny bit.
 

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Hmm, I changed the brake fluid on my truck after 13 years and only because one of the brake lines rusted through. I am guessing I missed that recommended change interval by a tiny bit.
I never changed the fluid in two Civic that were 18 and 19 years old. For that matter, I don't EVER recall changing brake fluid in any car I owned. I changed my own brakes/rotors too. With the Insight, I will be farming that work out.
 

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I never changed the fluid in two Civic that were 18 and 19 years old. For that matter, I don't EVER recall changing brake fluid in any car I owned. I changed my own brakes/rotors too. With the Insight, I will be farming that work out.
I think the main reason for brake fluid changes (Besides lining other people's pockets with money) has mostly to do with overall breakdown of the fluid over time and the fact that water can begin to form in the system over time. I'm certainly not here to lecture on this but I feel that the "relatively" low cost of fluid changes over time outweigh the problems that can occur in these systems due to fluids slowly breaking down or causing other troubles that are beyond me.

There has always been a big debate on how often to change car engine oil and you never seem to get the same answer. While formulations have improved on all these fluids (especially engine oil) I think many of us can agree that if you get into a car that has been sitting for 2 years without being driven we'd all tend to go get the old engine oil replaced if for no other reason than the fact it's been sitting there for years and may have broken down a bit or have other impurities. Even though we drive our Insights around quite a bit the brakes are not heavily used (in a traditional sense) and the fluid can degrade over time. Obviously many people have gotten away without doing this (myself included but mostly since I never considered it) I still think the braking system in my car will probably be in better shape 10 years down the line if I follow a routine and have the fluid bled out and changed every now and then rather than wait for a failure or the complete breakdown of the car in general. I think the costs are low enough that changing various fluids can actually extend the life and quality of various systems in the car over a longer period of ownership. Am I being a bit too snooty here? Does any of this make any sense to anyone? :unsure:
 

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I just would be cautious of the additional weight for any changes to your car. I know it's small or negligible. Cumulative weight gains will impact your overall mpg efficiency. I have a Touring, love it, but it does require a lot of attention to keep mpg > 45 mpg. I wondered why the seats were so limited and the reason being was the weight. Honda has been very careful on each model how options impact fuel efficiency the primary driver for purchasing a hybrid.
No need to worry about the weight additions. Honda added our wonderful aluminum hood to lower the weight in the front. For all those who were worried about the fluttering of the hood STOP IT! It's not a design flaw, it's aeronautics. The car is literally trying to fly a little and thus the weight is lowered in the front.🤪;)
 
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