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As a more objective (?) update to the 2020 CarBuzz rankings, Consumer Reports has shared its own list of "best" 2021 cars for city driving.

Evaluation criteria for city driving include tight turning radius, overall size, fuel economy, smooth ride, safety features, and convenience features like folding mirrors and surround-view cameras... and the Honda Insight made the list. Additionally, the Subaru Forester is recognized for its outstanding outward visibility, bucking the trend of sloped rear rooflines with a high roofline.
  • 2021 Toyota Prius
  • 2021 Honda Insight
  • 2021 Toyota Corolla
  • 2021 Mini Cooper
  • 2021 Subaru Forester
  • 2021 Honda CR-V
  • 2021 Toyota RAV4
Full article (with subscription) - Best New Cars for City Driving
Summary of article - The 7 Best Cars For City Driving
 

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As a more objective (?) update to the 2020 CarBuzz rankings, Consumer Reports has shared its own list of "best" 2021 cars for city driving.

Evaluation criteria for city driving include tight turning radius, overall size, fuel economy, smooth ride, safety features, and convenience features like folding mirrors and surround-view cameras... and the Honda Insight made the list. Additionally, the Subaru Forester is recognized for its outstanding outward visibility, bucking the trend of sloped rear rooflines with a high roofline.
  • 2021 Toyota Prius
  • 2021 Honda Insight
  • 2021 Toyota Corolla
  • 2021 Mini Cooper
  • 2021 Subaru Forester
  • 2021 Honda CR-V
  • 2021 Toyota RAV4
Full article (with subscription) - Best New Cars for City Driving
Summary of article - The 7 Best Cars For City Driving
I don’t understand a highway mpg that is so far above the city mpg. This is the opposite of how hybrids are supposed to work. It is also the opposite of the EPA numbers.
 

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Without getting into available Level 2 and 3 autonomous driving features...

Consumer reports neglected in my opinion the most important feature that eases city driving, One Pedal Driving.

None of the CR picks have it. These guys don't know what they are talking about or have never driven an EV with one pedal drive. With one pedal driving you basically don't need to use the brake.. except for sudden and emergency braking.

At least they chose the Insight and Prius which have brake hold, but they still don't have one pedal driving.

Then they didn't choose cars with auto e-brake disengage either...i.e. Audi A-4 where you can engage electronic parking brake at stop lights then just gas and the electronic parking brake with auto disengage.

I was stuck in heavy city traffic last week and even in the Insight with brake hold, it was not fun.

Just FYI, not all EVs have one pedal driving. Namely Tesla GM and Hyundai and Honda-e do. All of the VAG (Volkswagen Auto group), Porsche, Audi, VW do not offer it, and Honda Clarity neither
 

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Just FYI, not all EVs have one pedal driving. Namely Tesla GM and Hyundai and Honda-e do. All of the VAG (Volkswagen Auto group), Porsche, Audi, VW do not offer it, and Honda Clarity neither
A friend got a Polestar 2 about two months ago. She loves it, including the one-pedal driving.

With the Insight, I use the paddles to minimize conventional braking. It would be nice, as mentioned, if there was a more aggressive regen setting.
 

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A friend got a Polestar 2 about two months ago. She loves it, including the one-pedal driving.

With the Insight, I use the paddles to minimize conventional braking. It would be nice, as mentioned, if there was a more aggressive regen setting.
It's still a very weak regen. The battery is small so the regen has to be limited. I don't know typical regen and charge ratios, but I do know what the Model 3 does (due to scan my Tesla app). So let's use that as a baseline and then scale to see how the Insight would stack up.

Insight has a 1.2 kWh battery. For comparison, the Model 3 Long Range RWD has a 275 kW output and can regen approx 60 kW into an approx 75 kWh capacity battery. That a regen ratio of approx 0.22.

The Insight is a 96 kW motor and if could regen the same ratio... 96 kW x .22 = that would be capable of 21 kW regen, theoretical.

Now if we look at how much power we can dump into a battery, the Model 3 Long Range and Performance can dump 250 kW into a 75 kWh battery. That 250 kW can only be sustained for a few minutes at ideal conditions (Low charge and warm battery). That charge to capacity ratio is 250/75 = 3.3.

Consider the Insight now, with 21 kW max theoretically regen with a 1.2 kW battery. That ratio is 17.5 is way too high to sustain (recall only 3.3 for Tesla). Since you can't sustain that high of a charge ratio, you can't get any significant regen without having a larger battery. So without a larger battery you simply can't dump that regen energy, so there's no choice but to hit the friction brakes.
 
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