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Did this reviewer not take into account the styling of the Prius? I personally feel like that really hinders interest in it and its one of the main reasons we see people going for models like the new Insight instead.
 

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The Insight lost points on Reliability and Customer Satisfaction without any data to back it up. Mostly it was because the Prius had better scores on their road test. Most were on things mentioned on this forum. Engine noise, low seats, lane warning, etc. But also on things I like. Instrumentation was one. And transmission! What transmission? I’d like to post a copy of the side by side reviews here, but I don’t want to run into issues with their copyright rules.
 

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There was another new Oregon forum member who expressed disappointment compared to prior Prius.
This might be a controversial statement around here, but I believe that in terms of sheer fuel efficiency, the Prius is probably going to beat this generation Insight and I have accepted that.

Despite this drawback, I am enjoying My Insight over the Prius for many other reasons - better styling, better tech/infotainment, and more power. I believe these benefits outweigh the minor fuel economy hit, and it's still better MPG than non-hybrid sedans in its class.
 

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2019 Honda Insight EX (White Orchid Pearl)
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This might be a controversial statement around here, but I believe that in terms of sheer fuel efficiency, the Prius is probably going to beat this generation Insight and I have accepted that.

Despite this drawback, I am enjoying My Insight over the Prius for many other reasons - better styling, better tech/infotainment, and more power. I believe these benefits outweigh the minor fuel economy hit, and it's still better MPG than non-hybrid sedans in its class.
During my research on this car, I read Honda intentionally made the Insight not as fuel efficient as the Ioniq or Prius. They wanted the perfect balance of power and fuel efficiency. I think they definitely met this goal because I love sport mode as much as ev mode in this car. I actually enjoy driving this car(used ACC only once), can't say that with a prius.
 

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This might be a controversial statement around here, but I believe that in terms of sheer fuel efficiency, the Prius is probably going to beat this generation Insight and I have accepted that.

Despite this drawback, I am enjoying My Insight over the Prius for many other reasons - better styling, better tech/infotainment, and more power. I believe these benefits outweigh the minor fuel economy hit, and it's still better MPG than non-hybrid sedans in its class.
I think your statements are right on. I would never consider driving a Prius, mainly for the styling. The Insight made me receptive to considering hybrids, and won me over for the factors you mention. The "normal looking hybrid" factor is a big plus over other factors.
 

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I think your statements are right on. I would never consider driving a Prius, mainly for the styling. The Insight made me receptive to considering hybrids, and won me over for the factors you mention. The "normal looking hybrid" factor is a big plus over other factors.
I desperately wanted a hybrid that could get close to 50 MPG, so those older sedans that only get 43 were out of the question (Camry hybrid, Ford Fusion, Hyundai Sonata). I kept on revisiting Ioniq, but it just felt too cheap inside and too costly for the Limited model. Prius was too ugly and didn't even have Android Auto. I was about ready to get new Accord hybrid (where the back seats can fold down) and despaired that the new Insight would never appear, and then it did! Hyundai dropped the Ioniq prices very soon after Insight came out.

Anyway, back on topic. The other day I got a horrible 39 MPG on my morning commute (Santa Cruz to Monterey) in the rain. In the afternoon the roads were dry and I had a tailwind (20 MPH!) and got 50 MPG.
 

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Consumer Reports also got the mpg figures for the Insight wrong — in their car specific evaluation, they claim they achieved 62 mpg on the HIGHWAY and only 44 in the city, exactly the opposite of Reality!

See https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/honda/insight/2019/ratings?pagestop

You have to be a member to see that.

Looks like they changed their figures for that Corolla vs. Insight comparison linked to. They now say 49 mpg highway and 55 mpg city for the Insight. Someone there needs to update their actual ratings information!

Also, CR ignored the crash test results — the Insight has done better and is a safer car.

Why CR persists in claiming that the Insight is hard to get into and out of — or, that the push button gear selection is complex or confusing is beyond me!
 

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In my opinion the Insight is hard to get into and out of so I agree with Consumer Reports. The car sits low with low seats. My last 2 vehicles were a 2015 Honda Fit and a 2018 Honda HRV so those are obviously easier to get in and out of than the Insight. If I had it to do it over I would have kept the HRV with a CD player and 26 MPG (by my calculations). If you had cars rather than SUV type vehicles you would probably would not notice enter/exit annoyance as much. Being 74 years young, 6ft, 225 makes some difference too than most of the younger, fitter people buying the Insight. However the gas mileage helps make up for the poor access.
 

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If I had it to do it over I would have kept the HRV with a CD player and 26 MPG (by my calculations).
Having both a HR-V, and a Civic Hatch (almost Insight), I agree.
The HR-V is better for off-road, deep snow, getting into.
The Civic is better on gas, handling, lighter, highway driving.

Both great vehicles, so having one of each in the family gives us the best of both worlds.
 

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How Low Can You Go?

It clearly depends on what type of car/SUV one is used to driving! We drive a vintage Honda Accord and have no problems whatsoever with getting in and out of the Insight. I'd imagine that if one is used to vehicles that one climbs up into or sits high in, and that must be the case with Consumer Reports testers, then the Insight seems low.

As to being hard to get in or out of, though, that could be helped with regular stretching exercises! I'll bet that the "low" sensation or difficulty will also diminish or vanish over time as one gets used to it.

It's similar to people's experiences with bed mattresses. If you're used to an old-fashioned lower bed and get a newer thicker mattress, you feel high up and it's a piece of cake getting into and out of bed -- or, in some hotels, you seem too high up and your feet barely touch the floor, making it harder.

In any case, CR should qualify its statement saying something to the effect of "Some people may find..." or "Those are used to SUVs or higher seats may find..."

Push-Button Gear Selection

I think the same point applies to their "confusion" over the push button gear selector. They or the guy or gal who test drove the Insight must be so used to regular stick transmissions (even automatic) that they confuse easily. I also think that Consumers keeps regurgitating the same talking points... once they've written that push-button gear selections are tricky, they stick to the party line.

We were used to the automatic, big handle gear changer, with the grip for releasing the brake, but adjusted without any transition time.

MPG Figures Still Wrong

Note: They still haven't changed their report on the Insight, claiming it gets 62 mpg on the highway -- and only 44 in the city!

In any event, in spite of my criticisms, I still like Consumers and will keep subscribing to it. It's been helpful as I've researched new cars and many, many other products and services.
 

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Did this reviewer not take into account the styling of the Prius?
I am right there with you on that Point! I personally spent a ton of time Test Driving and Researching on all Hybrids, and the one thing I noticed about Toyota vs Honda is that Toyota's lowest base Trim is not even on-par with what Honda gives you as "Standard Package". The value of Honda's quality and Trim are much better than even Hyundai's Hybrid and Toyota's Camry Hybrid and they haven't even hit 50 MPG.
 

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I previously owned both a 2014 Civic and a 2016 Civic. On several occasions I pinched the skin of my hand in gaps on the gear shift knob. No problem with this on my 2019 Insight.
 
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