Gen 3 Insight Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I don't know when this article was written, and the results raise certain questions, but still Consumer Reports rates the Insight the best mpg on non-plugin hybrids:

https://www.consumerreports.org/fuel-economy-efficiency/the-most-fuel-efficient-cars-best-mpg/

The fact that they rate highway mpg much higher than city is curious at best, opposite of EPA and most people's experience. Either they got it backwards, or their tests are odd. Also surprising that the Ioniq, which is rated tops by EPA, does so differently on this test.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,317 Posts
Looks like the CR article was at least updated in Feb 2019, so plenty of opportunity to get the data and comparisons relatively current. They've posted the separate individual car reviews previously, and a few "head-to-head" reviews between similar cars - but it's helpful to see everything in one place with the Insight at the top of this latest summary. :)

Regarding city versus highway mpg for the Insight - the EV/hybrid mode kicks the most often in "low speed" conditions, meaning you'll save gas and get higher mpg in these conditions. At higher speeds, the gas engine kicks in more and the Insight operates like a "traditional" gas-driven one. (I like the attached page from manual as a visual for when the different modes kick in.) The official definitions for 'city' and 'highway' are based on EPA testing procedure, where the dividing point is 56-60 mph. (See the "Test Details" tab on this EPA page.)

The algorithms Honda, Toyota, and Hyundai use for triggering EV/hybrid mode are different and proprietary, with different optimizations between city and highway driving. It was interesting to learn in this thread on the Corolla Hybrid that the 2020 Corolla Hybrid and 2019 Insight get the same overall MPG, but the Insight is better in city and the Corolla is better on highway due to different gas/electric power strategy by manufacturer.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Tricky controls? Fussy push-button gear selector?

While I agree the lack of lumbar support adjustment may be an issue for some, I've never had an issue with the controls or their layout.

On a related note, I managed to get my lifetime MPG number back up to 60 after the winter driving season. Now that I have more knowledge under my belt, I'm going to see how much I can wring out of my work commute. There is road construction and a detour, but the new route, although a couple miles longer, is actually more fuel efficient.

Viva La Insight!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Yeah, there is something very retro about the Insight, while having the ACC and lane assist that function so flawlessly and futuristically.

I was reading an article about Clarity and the author basically took a number of road trips, describing the challenges of EV charging. Part of me wanted to splurge on the Clarity to get the $7.5k rebate, but after reading the article, it seems like such a headache to own an EV. ACC and lane assist are much more practical features and so is being free of charging stations. As more commuters crowd into those EV areas, it will make gas stations less crowded for the rest of us--at least in my area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
I like how the CR article doesn’t mention standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto until the Hyundai Ioniq, the third car in the list, two slots after the first-place Insight, which also has standard CarPlay and AA.

Consumer Reports' voice in cars is just shaky and inconsistent. I’m reminded of their seesawing on the Model 3, when it first was and then wasn’t an editor's pick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
push buttons

LOL!

Seeing that picture reminded of a car my grandparents had that, I believe, has push button gear selectors.

Haven't found it yet, but searched for “push button shifter on 1940s cars” and found a raft of photos!

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=push+button+shifter+on+1940s+cars&t=ipad&iax=images&ia=images
Most of your pix are Chrysler products starting in `57. That was a very trouble-free mechanical slot device. High-end Edsels starting in `58 and some Studebaker-Packard cars had electric buttons in the center of the steering wheel. That sped the demise of all those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
There certainly was a large variety of arrangements... Was Chrysler changing it each year?

One of the cars was 1956.

Wonder if any cars from the 1940s had it as that's I searched on!

I think a friends' grandparents had a 1948 Oldsmobile with a Hydromatic transmission; don't remember if that was push button shift or not...
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top