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2019 OWP Insight EX
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A Seinfeld episode came to miind as I was driving my daughter home from dance class tonight. I had 26 miles of range left and a 42 mile drive home. For the second time I drove "below the slash." In the end, I drove 28 miles below the slash. I'm curious if anyone else does this with any regularity. The Gen3 Insight has a 10.6 gallon fuel capacity. I'm not sure how much of this is "usable." I took about 9.25 gallons until the pump clicked off which got me a 69.7mpg average for the tank over 644 miles. Technically, I could have gotten a 700-mile tank.

Okay - here's the question - how far "below the slash" (in terms of miles below zero) has anyone driven their Insight?

 

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I have never gone below but I have gone much further than the range initially states.
I would never make this a regular thing nor trust it.
Your "predicted" range is based off very recent history only and can quickly change based off of driving conditions and many other factors.
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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Discussion Starter #3
In my head, I always figure I have ten gallons of fuel. Based on that, I know what my car can do safely. My question is - out of the 10.6 gallon tank, how much of that is "usable?" 9.25 gallons is my current "high score."
 

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In my head, I always figure I have ten gallons of fuel. Based on that, I know what my car can do safely. My question is - out of the 10.6 gallon tank, how much of that is "usable?" 9.25 gallons is my current "high score."
I'll start off by saying "I'm not a mechanic, but I play one on TV" before sharing my thoughts on this topic... Technically, I believe all the fuel in the tank is "usable" - meaning that it can be accessed to power the car until the fuel source runs out. However, I think there is a mechanical "cost" or impact to doing so.

The fuel pump sits inside the fuel tank and "pushes" gas out of the tank for use. (This is different from an in-line fuel pump, which would be used to "pull" fuel out of the tank for use.) When fuel tank level is low, the submerged fuel pump has to work harder mechanically to generate the same output pressure because because the lower fuel weight (lower level) no longer pushes fuel into the pump.

I think Honda considers "zero" to be 1.6 gallons left in the tank to account for situations like hard cornering or hills, where the fuel pump could be subjected to low/no level due to the angle/incline, causing the pump to starve for fuel. This is in addition to exposing the pump to any gunk or debris that may build up in the tank over time. Also (less likely but possible...), low liquid level can translate to high fume levels within the tank, especially in hot weather. The fumes are more likely to expand and contract than liquid form, which could pressurize and cause undue extra wear on the tank material itself.
 
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