Gen 3 Insight Forum banner

1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any suggestions or guide as to when it's best to use the 4 driving modes? Regular, Eco, Sport, and EV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Don’t know if this is the best methods but what I use those settings for:
1. Eco: what I use for most of my drive for optimal mileage (driving in ACC, keeping speed limit, driving on right slow lanes, etc...lol)
2. Regular: when I’m trying to take off from a stop and am not in the mood to hold up traffic.
3. Sport: when I want to make a fast turn before a cross oncoming traffic or when I want to pass someone.
4. EV: when im in local traffic and have enough power (at least four bars) to drive in EV to prevent automatic transfer to gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Here is what I've been using those setting for:


Eco: Flat highway/freeway/carpool lane

Regular: Suburbs, City, Uphill highway/freeway/carpool lanes, and takeoff from stoplights.

Sport: Takeoff from stop signs, crossing busy intersections, and merging on highway/freeway
EV: Not used, but I like what was posted above and will try it in local traffic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I read a lot about people using max reg. I really wonder if that is necessary. I spend nearly all my time in Adaptive Cruise Control. I suspect it uses as much regen as possible. It is about the only time I see my charge needle near 75% of the charge scale.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I'm using ECO all the time. All it seems to do is smooth out (dampen) control inputs onver normal mode. I can still take off like a bat out of **** if I want - I just need to hit the throttle more. Than again, I have a 50-mile farm road commute with a 45mph average speed limit and nearly zero traffic. I've only ever uses sport mode to see what it was like. It was noisy and favored engine over battery. It was cool being pushed into the back of the seat, but not worth the significant mileage hit. Regular vs. normal is essentially the same but with control input dampening.

EV will only work if:

You stay below the "power" band of the meter
You have more than three battery bars
The engine is not cold
The cabin is not actively being heated

That said, I'll kick in EV mode if enough battery exists and I'm on a slight upgrade where there is a downhill immediately thereafter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
I read a lot about people using max reg. I really wonder if that is necessary. I spend nearly all my time in Adaptive Cruise Control. I suspect it uses as much regen as possible. It is about the only time I see my charge needle near 75% of the charge scale.
Can you talk about that more? My gut tells me that adaptive cruise control, just like cruise control, is focusing on MPH instead of MPG.

I like to use Sport when I'm merging onto the freeway, EV when I'm on a straightaway in traffic (no temptation to accelerate), and Eco everywhere else. I did try my daily commute in both Eco and normal. 48 MPG normal, 52 MPG Eco. My commute is 30 miles one way and very hilly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I wish the "EV" mode button is on the steering wheel. There are 2 blank spots on the right side of the steering wheel. I wish "EV" button is on one of those two. Maybe the another blank one could be "Sport" button. I like charging up the battery in "Sport" mode to 80%+ and then go "EV" mode until the battery depletes to 20%. It's so satisfying somehow. I don't mind reaching out to the center console, but it's nice to have. Center console is much better location than where RAV4 Hybrid has. They're near the right foot where I can't reach while driving...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Ok, so I've been pondering this and think I've come up with a relatively simple explanation of the driving modes and why they are better for certain scenarios.

Eco Mode:
Prioritizes ev bursts, it doesn't build up the battery for sustained drives.

Best for stop and go/ traffic/ city. To achieve best results, coast as much as possible up to red lights/traffic.

Normal Mode:
The balanced approach. Depending on speed, engine load etc, this drive mode has the widest range of applications and computer input. On slower drives Normal mode will try to maintain 4+ bars of battery, but with enough traffic, will sometimes allow down to 2 bars of battery. On faster drives (45+) on flat highways, I've regularly seen this mode build up to 8 bars of battery and then run EV only until 4 bars. Rinse and repeat. It sustains EV only for a mile+ at time resulting in better highway mpg.

Best for Highway driving, and generally any time you will sustain a speed of 30+mph for any time longer than a minute or two.

Sport Mode:

This is not meant to be a fuel efficient mode, but a more aggressive mode. Under certain conditions, it can actually be the most efficient mode. (ie. Rolling hills). This mode prioritizes battery reserve, and unless at a set speed, or near full battery it rarely chooses to run EV only. The thing to remember here, is that if you are in a situation where the ICE would be running anyways. Terrain, drivetrain load etc... This is the go to mode, because every chance that it gets, the computer will charge the battery pack.

Observations:

The thing we all have to consider is that battery percentage directly correlates to fuel efficiency. If we have the opportunity to choose a route with a long descent over a shorter steeper descent, up until the point where the battery pack would be at a full charge, the longer descent wins. If we have the opportunity to take a slightly longer route, with less traffic/stop signs etc. that will always be the more fuel efficient route (with similar topography). If you know you are on a flat section, or descent, leading up to an incline, shifting to sport mode to build the battery charge will result in better overall fuel efficiency.

When we first got the car, it lived in Eco mode, but now after a couple months of exploration and observations, I actually swap modes accordingly, and have noticed better fuel efficiency. This may not be necessary for those that aren't "topography challenged" but for those of us where every commute involves climbs and descents, it's still possible to beat EPA mileage, albeit it a little more of a conscious effort.
 
  • Like
Reactions: andrew28

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
Good analysis Wifey.

I have lived in ECO mode for 18K miles and have been happy with my mpg results so far (excluding winter). I used to use sport mode for hill ascents, but found slowing a bit to remain in/near the blue power band is more effective. I have never really explored normal mode. I have found ECO mode to flatten the throttle response to eliminate jerky starts and general acceleration. At the risk of hurting my average, I may take your experience and try normal mode for my next tank. I'll need to concentrate a little more during acceleration though to ensure I'm still graceful. My drives are always rolling hills at a 45-50mph average. I don't do city driving, so I think it's the hills and inherent regen that help my numbers. I'm not sure I'd do as well in ECO if I lived in Kansas. I'll risk my next tank for the reward of knowing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Good analysis Wifey.

I have lived in ECO mode for 18K miles and have been happy with my mpg results so far (excluding winter). I used to use sport mode for hill ascents, but found slowing a bit to remain in/near the blue power band is more effective. I have never really explored normal mode. I have found ECO mode to flatten the throttle response to eliminate jerky starts and general acceleration. At the risk of hurting my average, I may take your experience and try normal mode for my next tank. I'll need to concentrate a little more during acceleration though to ensure I'm still graceful. My drives are always rolling hills at a 45-50mph average. I don't do city driving, so I think it's the hills and inherent regen that help my numbers. I'm not sure I'd do as well in ECO if I lived in Kansas. I'll risk my next tank for the reward of knowing.
I'd think that ECO mode is working towards your advantage with rolling hills.

Normal mode on highway actually gains mpg in as little as 5 mile jaunts vs eco.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
Good analysis Wifey.

I have lived in ECO mode for 18K miles and have been happy with my mpg results so far (excluding winter). I used to use sport mode for hill ascents, but found slowing a bit to remain in/near the blue power band is more effective. I have never really explored normal mode. I have found ECO mode to flatten the throttle response to eliminate jerky starts and general acceleration. At the risk of hurting my average, I may take your experience and try normal mode for my next tank. I'll need to concentrate a little more during acceleration though to ensure I'm still graceful. My drives are always rolling hills at a 45-50mph average. I don't do city driving, so I think it's the hills and inherent regen that help my numbers. I'm not sure I'd do as well in ECO if I lived in Kansas. I'll risk my next tank for the reward of knowing.
I took a hit for the team. I ran my last tank 100% in Normal mode to see how much of a difference there would be in my MPG numbers. I got 373 miles into the tank and threw in the towel. I got the worst tank results I've had since the depths of winter - 58.1mpg. To put things into perspective, my last three tanks were ~70mpg. That's a 13% drop in fuel efficiency. I did notice the differences in the algorithm (hey, who doesn't like saying "algorithm?") where the throttle response is different, the ICE kicks in sooner and EV isn't engaged as long when running in Normal mode. I think it's the rolling hills of my drive that affords me decent EV run-times in ECO mode. Where I know where the charging will occur, the Insight does not. ECO's heavier use of EV running means it won't try to charge the battery with the ICE as often, and the terrain does it instead based on my inputs.

Yet another reason I believe I have the perfect commute. I'm going back to ECO mode. I took a 0.1mpg lifetime hit in the name of science, but I learned something!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
@hasarad I primarily only use Normal for Highway. If at a set speed, (say 65mph) WITH ACC ON, and a relatively flat route, the algorithm is pretty self explanatory.

It runs ICE, to charge to 8 bars, kicks into EV back down to 3/4 bars, rinse and repeat.

Running Normal at 80+ for extended periods of time, the algorithm is not as self explanatory. The ICE runs constantly (90% percent of the time). The car rarely goes "EV only" and the battery stays pretty constant at 4-6 bars. Granted I haven't tested this on a relatively flat (say Texas/Arizona etc) highway.

ACC seems to affect the EV algorithm, especially at highway speeds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
@Wifey'sInsight, I can understand normal mode working well on flat terrain - charge top of range, bleed to bottom and repeat. ACC has never helped my mpg numbers primarily due to the fact it cannot anticipate, and my commute is not flat. Again, on a flat stretch, it may have its benefits. Tops speeds here in NJ are 65mph, so I can't speak from any experience how high-speed driving shakes out - I'm rarely on the highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I took a hit for the team. I ran my last tank 100% in Normal mode to see how much of a difference there would be in my MPG numbers. I got 373 miles into the tank and threw in the towel. I got the worst tank results I've had since the depths of winter - 58.1mpg. To put things into perspective, my last three tanks were ~70mpg. That's a 13% drop in fuel efficiency. I did notice the differences in the algorithm (hey, who doesn't like saying "algorithm?") where the throttle response is different, the ICE kicks in sooner and EV isn't engaged as long when running in Normal mode. I think it's the rolling hills of my drive that affords me decent EV run-times in ECO mode. Where I know where the charging will occur, the Insight does not. ECO's heavier use of EV running means it won't try to charge the battery with the ICE as often, and the terrain does it instead based on my inputs.

Yet another reason I believe I have the perfect commute. I'm going back to ECO mode. I took a 0.1mpg lifetime hit in the name of science, but I learned something!
Averaging 70mpg regularly?? :surprise: You take the cake! lol

Your commute must be a hybrid dream come true or you have the lightest gas pedal touch.. maybe both? :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
@Wifey'sInsight, I can understand normal mode working well on flat terrain - charge top of range, bleed to bottom and repeat. ACC has never helped my mpg numbers primarily due to the fact it cannot anticipate, and my commute is not flat. Again, on a flat stretch, it may have its benefits. Tops speeds here in NJ are 65mph, so I can't speak from any experience how high-speed driving shakes out - I'm rarely on the highway.
I find ACC only helps with Normal mode, highway type setting 45-75 mph.

For your situation Eco is the perfect choice because you have a lot of passive regeneration in your route.

I started a thread to humorously point out that sustained high speed driving is the Achilles heel of the Insight, I honestly believe that a manual 1.5l civic would have topped my numbers from that drive.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I find ACC only helps with Normal mode, highway type setting 45-75 mph.

For your situation Eco is the perfect choice because you have a lot of passive regeneration in your route.

I started a thread to humorously point out that sustained high speed driving is the Achilles heel of the Insight, I honestly believe that a manual 1.5l civic would have topped my numbers from that drive.
I picked up my wife at the airport a little over 50 miles from home in her 2018 Civic EX sedan last Friday. I averaged 50+mpg on the highway on the way there. The Insight wasn't designed to be a high-speed vehicle. Anything below 60 is gravy though.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,703 Posts
@hasarad You should consider submitting your numbers to fueleconomy.gov to bump up the current driver reported average MPG . https://www.fueleconomy.gov/mpg/MPG.do?action=mpgData&vehicleID=40351&browser=true&details=on It will help people doing research on the car that don't visit fuelly.com (https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=40845&id=40351&id=41214&id=40943). :smile:

Here's the one for the Touring for those that want to report with that trim. https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=40352
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
My boss has a Tesla and will occasionally take us out to lunch. He likes to be in our parking lot and punch the gas pedal to show its amazing acceleration. The sports mode is about 3/4 the acceleration of that. Still fun when they kids are not paying attention and I got a bit of good road ahead of me. Otherwise, it's a bit noisy.

I'm using ECO all the time. All it seems to do is smooth out (dampen) control inputs onver normal mode. I can still take off like a bat out of **** if I want - I just need to hit the throttle more. Than again, I have a 50-mile farm road commute with a 45mph average speed limit and nearly zero traffic. I've only ever uses sport mode to see what it was like. It was noisy and favored engine over battery. It was cool being pushed into the back of the seat, but not worth the significant mileage hit. Regular vs. normal is essentially the same but with control input dampening.

EV will only work if:

You stay below the "power" band of the meter
You have more than three battery bars
The engine is not cold
The cabin is not actively being heated

That said, I'll kick in EV mode if enough battery exists and I'm on a slight upgrade where there is a downhill immediately thereafter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I was driving normal all the time because I was tired of having to floor it all the time like in ECO but I've gone back to Eco for the mileage. I just switch between sport and eco. I have found that hills can be a mpg killer. My commute to work which is overall downhill I get high 50s to 60 and back home in the 40's.
I do like the acceleration from a complete stop. That little jump gets past many of the gas powered folks.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top