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Some of this may have already been discussed on this thread, but thought I would share it as well:

I just spoke to one of the service techs (who has been with Honda for over 10 years) at the dealer where I got my Honda, and he shared some interesting information:

- They use Honda Genuine 0-20 synthetic blend oil for their oil changes for the Insight.
- You can put Full synthetic in an engine that has or had synthetic blend without any issues.
- Your oil life reminder is an indicator of the life left in your oil, not the level of oil in your engine. You should make it a practice to check the dipstick on occasion to see if you are low on oil for any reason, and top it off yourself with a Honda approved oil (Oil & Filter FAQ for Honda Vehicles | Honda Maintenance)
- The oil life percentage indicator will decrease based on the type of driving you do. If your son drive it in sport mode all the time, it will likely decrease the life of the oil quicker than driving it in Eco mode.
- If your Insight hasn't gotten to 15% oil life before 10 to 12 months since your last oil change, change your oil. Never go past a year between oil changes.
- Oil companies that pay more for gasoline get to take the gas out of the top half of the tanker. Those that pay less (like the local Quicky-Mart) get the gas that is in the bottom half of the tanker, which means it is more likely to have contaminents in them.
- It isn't a good practice to let your car's gas get below 1/4 to 1/8 tank, as there is likely to be more "silt" from the bottom of your tank that gets mixed in with the gas that puts a strain on your fuel filter (or may make it through your fuel filter). This becomes more of an issue the older your car gets.
 

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- Oil companies that pay more for gasoline get to take the gas out of the top half of the tanker. Those that pay less (like the local Quicky-Mart) get the gas that is in the bottom half of the tanker, which means it is more likely to have contaminants in them.
- It isn't a good practice to let your car's gas get below 1/4 to 1/8 tank, as there is likely to be more "silt" from the bottom of your tank that gets mixed in with the gas that puts a strain on your fuel filter (or may make it through your fuel filter). his becomes more of an issue the older your car gets.
I'm curious about getting gas from the top half of a tanker. Seems to me they would use gravity to unload the tank. I can't see how you would skim the gasoline off the top. I suspect this is a myth to get you to buy overpriced gasoline from Shell, Exxon, Chevron, etc.

I could not find any studies about leaving 1/4-1/8 gas in the tank before you fill up. Apparently gasoline filters are pretty good and it may not be a problem.

I had 10-years experience with UNOCAL, but was not on the distribution end of things. It was my job to find the oil.
 

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I'm curious about getting gas from the top half of a tanker. Seems to me they would use gravity to unload the tank. I can't see how you would skim the gasoline off the top. I suspect this is a myth to get you to buy overpriced gasoline from Shell, Exxon, Chevron, etc. [...] I had 10-years experience with UNOCAL, but was not on the distribution end of things. It was my job to find the oil.
Oil grades are separated by distillation, which involves heating and cooling through a vertical tower. The purest vapor rises to the top and cools (condenses) to a liquid. Its not so much that the top half of tanker is the best; it's the top half of the distillation process, which is separated from lower grades of gas/oil.
 

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I could not find any studies about leaving 1/4-1/8 gas in the tank before you fill up. Apparently gasoline filters are pretty good and it may not be a problem.
This article has perspective from a 31-year petroleum industry resource on refueling. It recommends refill at 1/2 tank to minimize evaporation: "the more gas you have in your tank the less air there is." - https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/tips-for-pumping-gas/ Two other tips mentioned:
  • Avoid refueling while the tanker is at the gas station, to reduce the amount of dirt/sludge that gets to your tank when stirred up while gas is being delivered to storage tanks.
  • Slow filling is best to minimize vapor (and maximize liquid transfer) while refueling.
This second article mentions other more 'traditional' views on refueling at 1/4 tank - https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/why-you-should-always-keep-a-1-4-tank-of-gas-in-your-car-by-cheryl-knight
  • Newer fuel tanks are plastic (no rust), but sediment can still accumulate at bottom of fuel tank and get sucked into the engine.
  • Keeping fuel level above the fuel pump prevents risk of fuel pump overheating/failure.
 

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- Oil companies that pay more for gasoline get to take the gas out of the top half of the tanker. Those that pay less (like the local Quicky-Mart) get the gas that is in the bottom half of the tanker, which means it is more likely to have contaminants in them.
- It isn't a good practice to let your car's gas get below 1/4 to 1/8 tank, as there is likely to be more "silt" from the bottom of your tank that gets mixed in with the gas that puts a strain on your fuel filter (or may make it through your fuel filter). his becomes more of an issue the older your car gets.
I'm curious about getting gas from the top half of a tanker. Seems to me they would use gravity to unload the tank. I can't see how you would skim the gasoline off the top. I suspect this is a myth to get you to buy overpriced gasoline from Shell, Exxon, Chevron, etc.

I could not find any studies about leaving 1/4-1/8 gas in the tank before you fill up. Apparently gasoline filters are pretty good and it may not be a problem.

I had 10-years experience with UNOCAL, but was not on the distribution end of things. It was my job to find the oil.
I was under the impression that another reason not to let the tank get too low was because the fuel is used to physically cool the fuel pump and letting it get too low could cause premature wear on the pump due to higher temperatures.
 

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My personal reasoning for fuel ups is 1/4 tank. Minimize the fuel I use just going to the pump. Side effect, less average weight I carry around the better the MPG. Next in wintery conditions, I don't like letting my tank get below 1/2" for safety reasons. Might get stuck somewhere and that is the only thing to keep me warm until help arrives.
 

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Talked with a fellow who delivers gas to different stations regarding more expensive stations getting top gas and lesser stations getting bottom gas. He said it was not true. No difference in gas except additives. He had to add them to his delivery, which amounted to dumping a small amount of the additive in the tank.
 

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Talked with a fellow who delivers gas to different stations regarding more expensive stations getting top gas and lesser stations getting bottom gas. He said it was not true. No difference in gas except additives. He had to add them to his delivery, which amounted to dumping a small amount of the additive in the tank.
Gas station chains buy raw fuel and add ta detergent blend that is customized by brand. The quantity and type of detergents are trade secrets to each company. The EPA requires that all gas contain a minimum amount of detergent to keep car engines.
 

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The idea that some stations get their fuel from different levels in the trucks defy logic. I've watched tankers fill underground tanks and never observed that practice.
 

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I think the real reason many of us avoid the low cost gas stations is not that they get the dregs of fuel deliveries so trucks can return empty, but rather that they do so from multiple suppliers/brands, and as a result are selling a product of mixed additives....
 

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The idea that some stations get their fuel from different levels in the trucks defy logic. I've watched tankers fill underground tanks and never observed that practice.
I think "tanker trucks" are being confused with "distillation processing." The original post by Honda2019 mentioned gas quality difference within a tanker delivery, and I agree with you that it is a questionable statement.

Refineries use distillation to separate various segments oil byproducts using their chemical properties. Gasoline is one of the purer cuts, and is pulled as a byproduct toward the top of a distillation column. The EPA specifies a minimum amount of detergent oil companies must add to gasoline. Each oil company formulates their proprietary blend, and has quality tests/ranges for consistency. The gasoline delivered from a refinery via tanker delivery truck is relatively uniform; however tanker deliveries themselves can stir up sludge at the bottom of service station storage tanks due to the liquid volume/mixing.

Happy to geek out further if more info is desired; I have technical background in "Big Oil" which is perhaps the ultimate irony as a hybrid owner. :)
 

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Upcoming problems with oil change and gasoline:
Here's where we all are going to be silently bit unnoticed for awhile. Oil chg. at 8000 miles. Had free oil chg. with coupon , expiring in 3 days. Reluctantly, decided to use coupon providing Honda install Syn. , and I would pay difference. I think they lied. Next stop, one mile away, got 9 gal Mobil gas. NEW SIGN ON STATION SAYS( Now 10% Ethanol ) . On way home , 5 miles, indicator read 45 mpg. Usually, 52 mpg. Checked tires , all OK. I then drove 175 mikes and filled up .Actual showed 45.1 MPG. Drove same route, none over 70 and avg about 45 mph For 8000 miles I avg. overall 52.1 mpg. WHAT Happened???? Does anyone know? It was either the 10% ethanol or possible multi grade oil, instead of SYN.oil. Here's what I believe. We are all getting screwed. Honda installed a special oil with moly originally. You/we cannot buy that oil. That's why they want 12000 oil chg. After you change just be aware of change in mpg.
If it is the 10% Ethanol then we're in trouble. TRUMP wants to raise it to 15% soon to help corn farmers since China won't buy our corn. It approved we all are in real trouble. Might as well buy a big V8 truck.
Lets start a new topic and collect what others are experiencing after oil change.
 
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