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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I consider myself a pretty fuel-efficient driver, but even after using all the common sense techniques I'm "only" able to reach a max of 65 MPG on a typical round-trip drive, even in ideal conditions.

Aside from inflating tires well beyond their recommended PSI, how do hypermilers approach 80 MPG and beyond? I've read about it on this forum, but I'm starting to wonder if they're sort of like the tooth fairy. Much talked about but rarely seen...

Or maybe I have a lot to learn.
 

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I consider myself a pretty fuel-efficient driver, but even after using all the common sense techniques I'm "only" able to reach a max of 65 MPG on a typical round-trip drive, even in ideal conditions.

Aside from inflating tires well beyond their recommended PSI, how do hypermilers approach 80 MPG and beyond? I've read about it on this forum, but I'm starting to wonder if they're sort of like the tooth fairy. Much talked about but rarely seen...

Or maybe I have a lot to learn.
A lot of them live in hilly areas that allow them to travel mostly downhill at least either from or towards their destination. Several factors like how warm your engine is when you start, the temperature, and the route will determine your MPG. I don't think anyone here really gets 80mpg consistently everywhere they go, though I'm sure someone will correct me and provide some insight tips. 65 is great either way though.
 

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I would trade you my 50-55mpg for your 65mpg. :D My guess is that they happen to be driving in ideal terrain, speed, temperature, and traffic conditions. Which are variables outside of your control.

You can give Google Map's Eco route a try which takes into account all of the above except temperature.
This feature is very helpful, and Google is actually working on releasing routes for different car types, something that hasarad complained about it lacking in the thread you mentioned
 

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This feature is very helpful, and Google is actually working on releasing routes for different car types, something that hasarad complained about it lacking in the thread you mentioned
Awesome, looking forward to the new update. I've been using this feature to discover new fuel efficient routes to take on my trips.
 

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I consider myself a pretty fuel-efficient driver, but even after using all the common sense techniques I'm "only" able to reach a max of 65 MPG on a typical round-trip drive, even in ideal conditions.

Aside from inflating tires well beyond their recommended PSI, how do hypermilers approach 80 MPG and beyond? I've read about it on this forum, but I'm starting to wonder if they're sort of like the tooth fairy. Much talked about but rarely seen...

Or maybe I have a lot to learn.
I don't think anyone is consistently hitting 80 MPG with these cars. The highest I've seen is @Moviemike with his 69 MPG lifetime average on his 2019. But even he doesn't appear to have ever gotten 80 MPG on a full tank of gas. Rally Racer (Honda Insight) | Fuelly
 

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I've put up a couple low-mid-70s tanks, but that was when I had the perfect work commute. I was able to get a few drives over 80mpg for a 50-mile trip. Those days are gone since I switched jobs. I routinely put up 60+ mpg tanks outside of winter months. I don't consider myself a hypermiler, but I do pay attention to how I drive.
 

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I don't think anyone is consistently hitting 80 MPG with these cars. The highest I've seen is @Moviemike with his 69 MPG lifetime average on his 2019. But even he doesn't appear to have ever gotten 80 MPG on a full tank of gas. Rally Racer (Honda Insight) | Fuelly
I recently got a record high (for me) 78.8 mpg for a tank full. My prior record high was 77.x. I think that 78 figure is a false high because I suspect slightly less than a full tank at fill up (due to 1.5 mpg spread between car's mpg and calculations from gas pump and odometer. Normal spread is 0.75 mpg).

It has been sunny-er and warmer prior to last fill up. Some daily 50 mile drives have been above 80 mpg when 78 - 79 is ordinarily the best I can do. I got a one time personal best 83.x last year when the traffic gods, wind speed, direction, and battery warming sunshine were all in alignment. Also I'm up to 46k miles, the oem tires are getting worn, and that can help mpg.

I agree with Andrew 28 that a large number of uncontrolable driving conditions make a big difference. But still, there is a lot one can do, to better one's mpg within those conditions. For example awrxmcr has a higher lifetime mpg than I (70 mpg), but all his Insight driving seems to be below 50 mph. He uses other vehicles for highway trips.
 

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I'm happy with a 52mpg when I use to work at Best Buy. Nowadays I'm lucky to beat out 40mpg since I work less than a mile from home. 65mpg is nothing to sneeze at and is beyond the car's average MPG. Be REAL happy with it. Especially if you're able to get it without any effort or conscious thought on your part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
65mpg is nothing to sneeze at and is beyond the car's average MPG. Be REAL happy with it. Especially if you're able to get it without any effort or conscious thought on your part.
Oh there's definitely effort and conscious thought. Just nothing out of the ordinary as far as techniques go.

65mpg isn't my average, but I can approach it in ideal conditions. I still have some to learn to reach the 70mpg range which seems to be the ceiling, at least among posters here. Being stuck in Manhattan traffic doesn't help!
 

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Moviemike said:
For example awrxmcr has a higher lifetime mpg than I (70 mpg), but all his Insight driving seems to be below 50 mph. He uses other vehicles for highway trips.

My primary vehicle is the Insight, about 10-12,000 miles per year. I only did about 500 miles in my S2000 last year, so not enough to impact the insight mpg. I use the Insight on freeways all the time - especially driving regularly between La Jolla and Palm Desert.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Moviemike said:
For example awrxmcr has a higher lifetime mpg than I (70 mpg), but all his Insight driving seems to be below 50 mph. He uses other vehicles for highway trips.

My primary vehicle is the Insight, about 10-12,000 miles per year. I only did about 500 miles in my S2000 last year, so not enough to impact the insight mpg. I use the Insight on freeways all the time - especially driving regularly between La Jolla and Palm Desert.
What’s your tire PSI? Apart from typical regen stuff, what are you doing to manage 70 mpg?
 

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What’s your tire PSI? Apart from typical regen stuff, what are you doing to manage 70 mpg?
I check tire pressures around once a month, usually first thing in the morning, causes its the coolest yet convenient time of day, and use a battery powered air pump at home. I run 40 psi front 39 rear.

Active battery management is key. I seek to maximize use of EV mode, use EV for acceleration, ICE in low power need steady speed situations, and use downgrades for regen as well as acceleration. I've given away all my techniques in other threads. Good luck, hope tips are helpful..
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Active battery management is key. I seek to maximize use of EV mode, use EV for acceleration, ICE in low power need steady speed situations
I tend to save up battery for long hills by turning on Sport on flat roads, then switching to EV as I'm starting my ascent. Not sure if this is the right way to go about it. Perhaps just keeping it in Normal and then using any available battery when I reach the hill would be better.

Also, when in EV mode, does it matter how far up the blue bar I am? Is it still more efficient to stay mid-way up the blue bar?
 

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I tend to save up battery for long hills by turning on Sport on flat roads, then switching to EV as I'm starting my ascent. Not sure if this is the right way to go about it. Perhaps just keeping it in Normal and then using any available battery when I reach the hill would be better.
My preference is to arrive at the top of the hill with battery at its lowest point, and then using the downgrade to recharge.
I've been working (thinking and experimenting) for a long time on how to best meet the mpg challenge of the long hill.Here is what I'm doing now, which seems to be giving my best mpg uet:

I use Sport prior to the hill to build up battery reserve and, depending on conditions, speed. Then I continue in Sport to about half way up the hill, but allowing speed to drop off while using the far right 'slow truck' lane. At roughly the halfway point I'll drop out of Sport into Normal. Then as I near the top I'll push the EV button, and go for engine off operation for the last bit of the hill; with the goal of maintaining EV mode across the top and into the downgrade recharge.

My thinking is that I'm using Sport and Normal in the low and mid portions of the hill to mix stored battery power with ICE operation, to climb the hill and maintain some level of residual battery charge level (SOC). That SOC to be used at the top of the hill to insure maximum use of gravity on the downgrade for recharging. And also to avoid any delay in beginning the recharge process while at the top of the hill.

Also, when in EV mode, does it matter how far up the blue bar I am? Is it still more efficient to stay mid-way up the blue bar?
Yes. My guess is that the further up the blue bar ya go the faster the battery is discharging (or the amount of gasoline the ICE is using).. My biggest personal mpg challenge has been to moderate my urge for high acceleration. Keeping halfway up the blue section has been a big help with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If the engine is off. EV mode is on. Traffic is merely a problem of time, not of mpg :)
EV mode helps, but if traffic were moving the battery could be moving the car instead of simply keeping it running.

I appreciate your tips + advice! What I love about this car is that every drive feels like a learning experience -- a lesson in efficiency. Sure beats the mindless driving I used to do in "regular" cars.
 

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EV mode helps, but if traffic were moving the battery could be moving the car instead of simply keeping it running.
Yeah, I agree with this especially in the Summer and Winter. My battery level drops as I'm sitting in traffic with the HVAC on trying to keep cool or warm. I don't mind traffic as much during the Spring or Fall since I can sit in EV mode with just the fan on/off which doesn't drain the battery as quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Last night I drove from upstate NY to Manhattan and I tried a new technique. I was able to touch 70 MPG for the first time, even after 40 miles of driving. I ended my trip at 68mpg, which is still higher than I've ever reached on this long a trip.

I stayed in Normal mode the entire time, but what I did differently was max out all downhill stretches by accelerating more than I needed to and "banking" all the extra acceleration by double tapping the left regen paddle. Typically what I've done on downhills is ease off the gas as I'm approaching traffic and hit the regen only as needed. This time I took advantage of each downhill stretch and slightly accelerated even as I was approaching traffic ahead. Of course I eventually did hit the regen paddle to keep a safe following distance, but the energy I was banking was way higher than it would normally be after a long coast.

I find it strange that a "gas + bank" strategy seemed to give me higher mpg than a normal "foot off gas + modest regen" approach.

It's all a bit tough to put into words but has anyone else tried this? I've only tried once but the numbers speak for themselves, I think.
 

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It makes sense if you think about it. If you didn't accelerate and depending on how long of a downhill stretch your battery would become full quickly. Once it becomes full your engine fires up to burn off the regenerated energy instead of storing it in the battery. By accelerating when needed you're preventing the battery from reaching max capacity and allowing yourself to coast down in EV mode as long as possible.

Edit: I think I mis-read what you wrote above. My guess is that you're regenerating energy at a higher rate than using when accelerating depending on how steep that downhill is.
 
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