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Parking issues?

Hi all,

I am looking to move into a large city soon where the parking is very expensive. I was thinking about taking my car to my parents house and letting it sit to avoid paying hundreds of dollars a month to park. I am told that parking hybrid vehicles for a long time causes issues. Is this true for a 2019 Insight? If so, what are those issues and how could I mitigate them?

Any and all advice/insight (no pun intended) welcome

Thank you!
 

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I am looking to move into a large city soon where the parking is very expensive. I was thinking about taking my car to my parents house and letting it sit to avoid paying hundreds of dollars a month to park. I am told that parking hybrid vehicles for a long time causes issues. Is this true for a 2019 Insight? If so, what are those issues and how could I mitigate them?
Honda recommends that the Insight be turned on at least 30 minutes once every 3 months to keep the HV battery charged. Identical recommendation is made by Toyota for the Prius regarding length of run time and maximum time interval between runs, so this seems to be a common need for hybrid battery maintenance.

There are 2 batteries in the car:
  • The HV battery is the larger battery pack which the car uses for power, and it is located under the rear seats. It gradually discharges even while the car is not in use. If the HV battery drains too low, it will prevent the car from starting up since it's one of the start-up checks the car performs. Running the car recharges the HV battery (which in turn recharges the 12V battery via DC-to-DC converter).
  • The 12V AGM battery runs accessory systems and is also part of the start-up check. The 12V battery is located in the cabin (vs under the hood), in the front center console, but can be 'jumped' from terminals located under the hood. The manual suggests that a 'compatible AGM charger' can be used on the Insight 12V battery, and there are suggestions for trickle chargers earlier in this thread.
  • Note that the trickle charger is only for maintaining the 12V battery, and will not charge the HV battery; the HV battery is charged only by turning the car on.

Worst case, there is some info on jump starting the 12V battery in a separate thread... but keep in mind that if the HV battery is dead/depleted, jump starting the 12V battery alone won't start the car - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/2...es/680-portable-jump-starter-12v-battery.html
 

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Interesting that the documents/links are for "pre-delivery service" (PDS) - meaning they're intended for dealer use before sale, rather than for the consumer. Seems like Toyota takes into account that hybrid vehicles can sit on dealer lots for a while, and require special checks to ensure battery quality and mechanical health. Would be nice if this type of information was communicated as a standard to all consumers.

The PDS that I've seen from Honda aren't nearly this detailed. I hope Honda internally has a detailed version like Toyota's; but given some of the 'battery failure' issues reported already among forum members, methinks Honda is lacking in this area...
 

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Well, I read everything I could and talked to everyone that claimed to know anything about whether we could charge or tender the 12v battery. Every source said no and claimed that if I parked the car for 2 months when I'm in Florida it wouldn't hurt anything. I'll find out soon. I parked my 2019 Insight Sept 27 and hope to get back in it about November 23. We will see how good that battery really is. Cross your fingers folks.
 

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Well, I read everything I could and talked to everyone that claimed to know anything about whether we could charge or tender the 12v battery. Every source said no and claimed that if I parked the car for 2 months when I'm in Florida it wouldn't hurt anything. I'll find out soon. I parked my 2019 Insight Sept 27 and hope to get back in it about November 23. We will see how good that battery really is. Cross your fingers folks.
Looking forward to read about the outcome. :)
 

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Winter storage

I live in rural Minnesota, and need to store my 2019 insight for the winter in a well ventilated outbuilding through much of the winter. Once the heavy snows come I won’t be able to drive the car until spring. I have two questions:
1. Can I use an AGM float/maintenance charge like the following to keep the 12v battery charged?
Battery Tender Plus 12V, 1.25A Battery Charger https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00068XCQU/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_tai_XM86DbEFSXSET

2. Will I be able to keep the HV battery alive and well by just starting the Insight once per month for 30+ minutes. I can do this at around 3000 rpm if needed, and can open large doors on the building to keep things well ventilated.
 

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1) That charger should work well with our AGM battery.

2) It should be fine, if you have enough room in the building, I'd pull it forward and backward a couple times to make sure the drivetrain stays well lubricated and to prevent flat spots on the tires from developing.

Obviously if you have a nice weather day, I'd take the car out for a short drive. (Also be sure to check for rodents and other animal debris, and hope they haven't chewed on anything.)
 

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I live in rural Minnesota, and need to store my 2019 insight for the winter in a well ventilated outbuilding through much of the winter. Once the heavy snows come I won’t be able to drive the car until spring.
Welcome to the forum. If you're able to start the Insight once a month for 30 minutes, that should be sufficient to keep the batteries charged, since it is a shorter interval (1 month) versus the 3 month maximum Honda advises. The HV battery recharges the 12V battery via DC-to-DC converter (vs alternator). There are some tips from long-term Toyota hybrid storage that may also be useful to reference before storing the Insight.
Post 19 - How to trickle charge 12v when laying up Insight

If you still opt for a trickle charger, the trickle charger in your link looks compatible with AGM batteries, which is good. But note there are mentions earlier in the thread that a dealer recommended the trickle charger be connected in-cabin directly to the 12V battery, rather than using the under-hood jump start points.
AGM thread - 12 Volt AGM Battery - specs and replacement
Post 06 - How to trickle charge 12v when laying up Insight
Post 11 - How to trickle charge 12v when laying up Insight
Post 17 - How to trickle charge 12v when laying up Insight

And (worst case) you end up needing to jump start the Insight, there are some suggestions from the forum for portable jump starters here - Portable Jump Starter for 12V Battery

Good luck!
 

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Oh I forgot to add, for storage purposes, pull the battery access panel off and when you go in the building to start the vehicle, open the vehicle door for a few minutes before you start the vehicle. It's always best to error on the side of caution with the chemicals that can settle from off-gassing and storage. (Obviously have some source of ventilation for when the car is running for the building).

In the spring, I'd clean all of the car windows, and let the car sit for at least 10 minutes with the doors and trunk open to further air out anything that could have settled in the vehicle.
 

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I discovered that you can’t rev the insight to 3000 rpm with the car in park or neutral. However, With the car running, when I press the accelerator while in neutral it appears the HV battery is charging, but the engine never reveled. After about 20 minutes the charge status went from 4 to 10 on the guage. Does this sound correct? If so, I think my problem is solved.
 

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I discovered that you can’t rev the insight to 3000 rpm with the car in park or neutral. However, With the car running, when I press the accelerator while in neutral it appears the HV battery is charging, but the engine never reveled. After about 20 minutes the charge status went from 4 to 10 on the guage. Does this sound correct? If so, I think my problem is solved.
You shouldn't need to rev the engine to get the HV battery to charge (and it's not the design of the Insight/hybrid to do so). If I start the car and let it idle long enough (without any throttle use), the HV battery charge gradually increases on its own. I believe this is why Honda recommends running the car (idle) for a longer period (30 minutes) once every 3 months to maintain HV battery charge.
 

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Wondering... who is the right group for buying/needing a battery maintainer or trickle charger? Is it solely for people who drive their Insight infrequently? Or is it something every Insight owner should have? I haven't needed one for conventional lead acid batteries on cars...
 

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Wondering... who is the right group for buying/needing a battery maintainer or trickle charger? Is it solely for people who drive their Insight infrequently? Or is it something every Insight owner should have? I haven't needed one for conventional lead acid batteries on cars...
Mainly for infrequent drivers, putting the car in storage, or a car that has a history of fully draining the 12v battery. https://www.optimabatteries.com/en-us/experience/2013/07/do-i-need-battery-maintainer
You also want a charger + maintainer vs just charger if you need one. https://www.goldeagle.com/tips-tools/use-battery-maintainer/
 

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Mainly for infrequent drivers, putting the car in storage, or a car that has a history of fully draining the 12v battery. https://www.optimabatteries.com/en-us/experience/2013/07/do-i-need-battery-maintainer
Paraphrasing the interesting points from the above article, for quick reference in this thread:
  • Older cars have fewer electrical accessories that discharge batteries while the engine is off, but newer cars with memory seats, radio presets, satellite radio, car alarms and other modern accessories continue to draw current while parked.
  • A battery in a 1957 Chevy may be able to sit months with very little voltage loss, while a new C7 Corvette may completely discharge a battery in a matter of just a few weeks of non-use. Running your car or boat on the weekends may not be enough to properly-maintain your battery.
  • Manufacturers of exotic and high-end new cars [...] acknowledge the level of electrical sophistication in their vehicles has advanced so far, that regular use of a battery maintainer is now simply part of ownership of those vehicles.
  • Many owners think periodically starting and idling their vehicle is a viable alternative to using a battery charger or maintainer. But the energy consumed by the car during storage and starting won't be replaced by simply letting it idle and places strain on the car's charging system. (--> this seems different for the Insight and other hybrids, since different charging system -?)
 

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Wondering... who is the right group for buying/needing a battery maintainer or trickle charger? Is it solely for people who drive their Insight infrequently? Or is it something every Insight owner should have? I haven't needed one for conventional lead acid batteries on cars...
The insight is smart key which can double or triple the amount of draw overnight on the 12v battery vs a car with a regular key. Insight also has a smaller than average battery. I would say if you are driving less than 30-35 miles a week and/or not driving highway you should consider a float charger. If you install an aftermarket alarm/remote start(anything that adds constant draw) at that mileage a float charger would be a requirement. And near that driving range never use the ignition with ready mode off and turn off all accessories before shutting the car off and you will be ok.
 

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Well, I read everything I could and talked to everyone that claimed to know anything about whether we could charge or tender the 12v battery. Every source said no and claimed that if I parked the car for 2 months when I'm in Florida it wouldn't hurt anything. I'll find out soon. I parked my 2019 Insight Sept 27 and hope to get back in it about November 23. We will see how good that battery really is. Cross your fingers folks.

Still curious if there is anything new on this out there. Last summer I parked by 2019 Honda Insight in a garage for 5 weeks and came back to a dead car. A jump start, 20 miles later and parked overnight found it dead again. Another jump start and 60 miles of driving got it going for the next 6 months. Here it is April. 2 weeks parked and it turns up dead. A jump start and 20 miles left it dead again 4 hours later.

Heading back to the dealer in the am. Hoping to find a car that works.
 

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Still curious if there is anything new on this out there. Last summer I parked by 2019 Honda Insight in a garage for 5 weeks and came back to a dead car. A jump start, 20 miles later and parked overnight found it dead again. Another jump start and 60 miles of driving got it going for the next 6 months. Here it is April. 2 weeks parked and it turns up dead. A jump start and 20 miles left it dead again 4 hours later.

Heading back to the dealer in the am. Hoping to find a car that works.
What should I do to prepare my Honda vehicle for long-term storage (more than 1 month)?

Long-term vehicle storage can be required for a variety of reasons. It is mainly beneficial for Honda owners who might be traveling, serving in the military, or are simply preserving their infrequently used car. To ensure the vehicle operates smoothly once it’s running again, certain instructions must be followed and maintenance should be performed. Storing a vehicle improperly can ultimately lead to serious damage, both inside and out.

American Honda’s minimum recommendation for long-term storage of conventionally-powered vehicles are listed below:

Tools and supplies needed:
  • Engine oil and filter
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Tire pump
  • Floor jack
  • Jack stand or block
  • Towels or shop rags
  • Vehicle cover
Instructions before storing the vehicle:
  • Fill up the fuel tank with the appropriate gasoline specified in the owner’s manual
  • Replace the engine oil and filter
  • Wash and dry the exterior completely
  • Clean the interior; make sure carpeting, floor mats etc. are completely dry
  • Block the rear wheels to avoid any slippage or movement
  • Cover any gaps, such as an exhaust pipe or an air intake, to ensure critters are not able to enter
  • If there are any paint chips, have them repaired
  • Replace the engine coolant, if needed, at the time of storage
  • Support the front and rear wiper blade arms with a folded towel or rag so they do not touch the windshield
  • To minimize sticking, apply a silicone spray lubricant to all door and tailgate seals; also, apply a vehicle body wax to the painted surfaces that mate with the door and tailgate seals (please see a Honda dealer for fluid recommendations)
Instructions when storing the vehicle:
  • Leave the parking brake off; put the transmission in Reverse (manual) or Park (automatic)
  • Disconnect the 12-volt battery cable
  • Operate the engine at the normal operating temperature specified in your owner’s manual for 15 minutes before turning off the engine
  • Cover the vehicle with a “breathable” cover, one made from a porous material such as cotton (non-porous material, such as plastic sheeting or trap moisture, can damage the paint)
  • If stored in a temperate, ventilated garage (indoors), the windows can be left slightly open
  • If possible, run the engine monthly until it reaches full operating temperature (the cooling fans should cycle on and off twice); this will ensure proper lubrication
  • If the vehicle is stored longer than 1 month, raise the vehicle on a level surface and place on jack stands or blocks to prevent flat spots on the tires
  • For hybrid owners, reconnect the 12-volt battery and drive your vehicle every month for about 30 minutes ; this will keep the IMA battery charged and in good condition (if a hybrid vehicle is unused for over one month, the service life of the IMA battery will be reduced and the battery may become permanently damaged)
Instructions for bringing the vehicle out of storage:
  • Have the 12-volt battery charged and reconnect the battery cable
  • Check the fluid levels and add/replace, as needed
  • Check for any leaks underneath the vehicle
  • Check and inflate the tires to the correct pressure before taking the vehicle off the jack stands or blocks
  • After starting the engine, observe the warning lights; if any are illuminated, have the vehicle inspected by your Honda dealership
  • Check the brake pedal for normal feel (height and firmness) before shifting the transmission
  • Take the vehicle to your Honda dealership for general inspection
Note: If you are planning to store your vehicle for more than 6 months, please consult with an authorized Honda dealership.

^I found the above from Honda's FAQ site. It might be better to disconnect the 12v AGM battery if you don't plan on driving your Insight for awhile. I've also read that if an AGM Battery is allowed to fully discharge it can hurt the overall life of the battery unlike regular 12v flooded batteries.

I've been driving(5-10 miles) my Insight twice a week on the highway then back home to keep both batteries(12v AGM & Lithium-ion) healthy.
 

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Still curious if there is anything new on this out there. Last summer I parked by 2019 Honda Insight in a garage for 5 weeks and came back to a dead car. A jump start, 20 miles later and parked overnight found it dead again. Another jump start and 60 miles of driving got it going for the next 6 months. Here it is April. 2 weeks parked and it turns up dead. A jump start and 20 miles left it dead again 4 hours later.

Heading back to the dealer in the am. Hoping to find a car that works.
I've gone long-ish periods (4 wks) between drives and haven't had issue, based on Honda's "run for 30 minutes every 3 months" rule of thumb. Some curiosity questions/thoughts:
  • Were all your issues only in warm weather / summer, since it ran without issue for 6 months and is just now getting to warm weather again?
  • Do you have any aftermarket accessories plugged in via USB or power outlet while car is off? (e.g. dash cam) Could there be a slow power drain?
  • When was your car built (see MM/YY on driver side sticker) and when did you buy it? Some owners with >6 month difference from build to buy date have seemed to have issues.
  • Do you recall what HV battery level(s) you've your car at before parking for extended time? I try to leave mine at 50+% when i know I won't be driving it for a while.
  • What kind of mpg are you getting and/or average speed do you drive (as a proxy for HV battery health and EV cycle)? The 12V battery gets recharged via DC-to-DC converter from HV battery (rather than alternator), which sounds like may have a problem if not staying recharged between drives.
  • Do you have any readings on the 12V battery charge? Falling below 12V shortens battery life and/or causes permanent damage; might be worth trying a new 12V battery altogether, since it's covered under warranty and may already be damaged.
 
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