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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I'm looking to upgrade my shock absorber and spring for best riding comfort. I want it to be stock height, not into lowering. Has anyone upgraded their suspension for better riding comfort? Looking for guide and tips on what to buy. Thanks in advance!

Edit: I drive a lot on a bumpy roads.
 

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Are you ready for new struts, etc..? If not it's very pricey to do just to do it. And yes I agree I would not lower this car that's already low enough. FWIW tires have a lot to do with the ride comfort as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you ready for new struts, etc..? If not it's very pricey to do just to do it. And yes I agree I would not lower this car that's already low enough. FWIW tires have a lot to do with the ride comfort as well.
I have 16” stock wheels. How much r we talking to upgrade suspension? I heard we have the same suspension as civic but most civic owners wants lowered and performance. I just want super comfortable ride.
 

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I have 16” stock wheels. How much r we talking to upgrade suspension? I heard we have the same suspension as civic but most civic owners wants lowered and performance. I just want super comfortable ride.
Well I haven't had to do this to my Insight yet. If doing yourself parts front and back will be hundreds of dollars and then you have to have the car aligned I believe. If you pay a shop I'd guess well over $1000. Great parts might improve the ride a little but how much is unknown.
 

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Hello. I'm looking to upgrade my shock absorber and spring for best riding comfort. I want it to be stock height, not into lowering. Has anyone upgraded their suspension for better riding comfort? Looking for guide and tips on what to buy. Thanks in advance!

Edit: I drive a lot on a bumpy roads.
You can look for a suspension (springs and shock absorbers, etc.) - but it's time consuming and expensive.
For more comfort, you can lower the tire pressure a bit.
And in the future (how the tires wear 215/55 / R 16) go to 215/60 / R 16). This will add a tread height of +11 mm and the stroke will be "softer". The ground clearance will grow by the same distance. Note that the real speed will increase (due to the tire) by 3.4% (When the speedometer shows 100 km / h, the real speed is 103.4 km / h). I hope the laws in the United States allow you to put a little bigger tires. Sorry to write in metric quantities, I understand them in life.
Yes, fuel consumption will increase slightly when switching to these tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You can look for a suspension (springs and shock absorbers, etc.) - but it's time consuming and expensive.
For more comfort, you can lower the tire pressure a bit.
And in the future (how the tires wear 215/55 / R 16) go to 215/60 / R 16). This will add a tread height of +11 mm and the stroke will be "softer". The ground clearance will grow by the same distance. Note that the real speed will increase (due to the tire) by 3.4% (When the speedometer shows 100 km / h, the real speed is 103.4 km / h). I hope the laws in the United States allow you to put a little bigger tires. Sorry to write in metric quantities, I understand them in life.
Yes, fuel consumption will increase slightly when switching to these tires.
Thanks for the input. Might consider going 215/60/r16. I wonder if Michelin have energy saver with 215/60/r16.
 

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For more comfort, you can lower the tire pressure a bit.
I've gone with running Honda's recommended PSI in the summer even with the Touring to get a soft ride in urban rough road Chicago. In the winter, whether it is because the tires are cold as well as the shocks, I've been running 2 psi below.

When the weather changes significantly, even in the roller coaster temps of spring (or fall?) - I check psi and adjust to match, especially for longer drives. Going from colder to hotter weather, you're going to get too firm a ride without adjusting. Going from hotter to colder, you may not notice a change in the ride as much but there could be a risk of not enough inflation to protect your wheels. (This could depend on how fast your drive and how rough your roads are.)

When in doubt, start with recommended PSI and drop a little at a time until you find desired comfort. There's a point where 2 psi makes a palpable difference.
 
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