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Hello all. I purchased an Insight Touring about four months ago and after finding this forum I realized I could learn so much! I purchased a hybrid because I wanted a car with fabulous gas mileage. I’ve been averaging 44 MPG which I thought was fantastic after getting about 25 MPG in my previous car. After reading many threads I now see I should be getting much better MPG. I live in Tucson, Arizona and do mostly in town driving. Not many huge hills but there are a few. I am just learning the difference between different driving modes and I’m still trying to figure out the different gauge displays and what they mean. I haven’t even touched the paddles. I would really appreciate any and all advice! Thank you in advance.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Did you buy a 2020 model?

The main thing that helps a hybrid deliver high-MPG is high voltage battery management. The more time the car spends in EV or hybrid mode (i.e. green "EV" symbol comes on in bottom left corner), the more HV battery you're using... and consequently less gas to power the car, and more 'miles traveled' per gallon of gas used. Some thoughts that come to mind:
  • If you're driving in Normal Mode, you should see some 'instant' help/benefit by driving in Eco Mode, which dampens the gas pedal response (and A/C). It will 'feel' different (sluggish?) if you're used to Normal Mode, but it will help with MPG.
  • What % of driving time is spent on highway, and at what speed? The Insight's city MPG rating is higher than its highway MPG rating, and highway speeds over ~65 mph deliver even lower-than-rated results. Could you be 'undoing' your city MPG average results by driving >65 mph?
  • Hills are both a 'challenge' (consumes energy uphill) and an 'opportunity' (can bank energy downhill). If your routes are familiar, learning to anticipate a hill by having ample battery charge and being prepared to use the paddles on downhill side can help.
  • Learning about the Power/Charge meter and trying to manage your driving in the "blue" (and green) helps ensure your driving is 'balanced' in terms of power used by and accumulated in the HV battery. Driving in the "gray" areas consumes more power and triggers the gas engine (aka ICE or internal combustion engine) to run more, reducing MPG.
Related threads:
 

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I would love to add to @insightfully's comments, but pretty much everything is covered. The only thing I'd add is to anticipate everything. Slowing traffic, red lights/stop signs upcoming hills and downhills, etc. All of these are an opportunity to charge the HV battery if you plan ahead. After two years, I rarely use my brakes except for the final 50 feet to come to a full stop. The paddles are your friends to use in lieu of brakes when you have a long downhill to manage speed.

Welcome to the Insight party. I'm a little over two years in and still get giddy when I get to drive!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Welcome to the forum. Did you buy a 2020 model?

The main thing that helps a hybrid deliver high-MPG is high voltage battery management. The more time the car spends in EV or hybrid mode (i.e. green "EV" symbol comes on in bottom left corner), the more HV battery you're using... and consequently less gas to power the car, and more 'miles traveled' per gallon of gas used. Some thoughts that come to mind:
  • If you're driving in Normal Mode, you should see some 'instant' help/benefit by driving in Eco Mode, which dampens the gas pedal response (and A/C). It will 'feel' different (sluggish?) if you're used to Normal Mode, but it will help with MPG.
  • What % of driving time is spent on highway, and at what speed? The Insight's city MPG rating is higher than its highway MPG rating, and highway speeds over ~65 mph deliver even lower-than-rated results. Could you be 'undoing' your city MPG average results by driving >65 mph?
  • Hills are both a 'challenge' (consumes energy uphill) and an 'opportunity' (can bank energy downhill). If your routes are familiar, learning to anticipate a hill by having ample battery charge and being prepared to use the paddles on downhill side can help.
  • Learning about the Power/Charge meter and trying to manage your driving in the "blue" (and green) helps ensure your driving is 'balanced' in terms of power used by and accumulated in the HV battery. Driving in the "gray" areas consumes more power and triggers the gas engine (aka ICE or internal combustion engine) to run more, reducing MPG.
Related threads:
Yes I bought a 2020. I told myself I would never buy a brand new car again but I really wanted a hybrid and the used Insights I found were very close in price to the new ones. I have only seen one other Insight in Tucson. Thank you so very much for those tips. I am looking forward to looking at all the threads you sent links to. And looking forward to trying the paddles for the first time and paying attention to the blue and green zones now that I know what I’m looking at. Fortunately, I very rarely drive on a freeway or highway. Thank you again!
 

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Screenshot_2020-08-23 ATXM2020OM PDF.png


Eco Drive Display is a good option for beginners to get immediate feedback on their acceleration and braking from the car (the floor underneath the car icon glows green for good). You can select it in the home menu on the steering wheel. Once temps get above 80F the car works harder to keep the cabin cool so fuel economy can drop if your trips are short. Play around with the AC temp to where you can get the cabin comfortable but not have the AC work as hard(like 70-72F). It could be a tough ask considering it's 100F+ where you're at. 😅
 
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Once temps get above 80F the car works harder to keep the cabin cool so fuel economy can drop if your trips are short.
This mention of short drives reminds me of another dimension that affects fuel economy. There's a "minimum run time" for the ICE when it first starts up, and for drives less than ~3-5 miles, it's hard to overcome this 'forced' mpg loss.

@NicoleK - what's the average distance that you typically drive per trip at city speeds?
 

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My drive to the gym is 2 miles each way and my drive to work is 10 miles each way. Today I put the eco-drive display up and watched the power/ charge meter and I used the paddles. I was so busy with all of that I forgot to try to adjust the air conditioner. I just always have it on as cold as it possibly can go. It is 5 PM and my iPad says it’s 106°. I’m sure if I adjust that, that would help as well. Thanks everyone.! Very much appreciated!
 

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My drive to the gym is 2 miles each way and my drive to work is 10 miles each way. Today I put the eco-drive display up and watched the power/ charge meter and I used the paddles. I was so busy with all of that I forgot to try to adjust the air conditioner. I just always have it on as cold as it possibly can go. It is 5 PM and my iPad says it’s 106°. I’m sure if I adjust that, that would help as well. Thanks everyone.! Very much appreciated!
Ha, yes - there's a lot of dials/gauges one can watch, it's almost like a (mpg) game.

If Econ Mode was one of the things you also activated/tried today, the A/C management process was automatically dampened a bit (versus Normal Mode for same temperature setting). Here's how it reads from the Owners Manual (OM19 pg 467):
5724

If you want to venture further into climate management for additional fuel efficiency gains beyond Econ Mode, you can try running the system in 'manual' mode (versus 'auto'). And for more perspective, other suggestions and experiences on climate control are in the following thread: How best to use climate control efficiently?.
 

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I read all about climate control and I thoroughly enjoyed reading peoples posts about how they would prefer to freeze than turn the heat on to increase their mpg. Very entertaining reading for me. I did have my air conditioner on 80 on my drive home from work just now, even though it is still 105°. Normally it would be on the coldest setting. Thanks so so much to everyone who took the time to post links for me and/ or offer advice. I wish I could post the picture I took as soon as I parked my car in the garage. My screen said I averaged 70.2 mpg on my 10 mile drive home that included 1 stop to pick up my grocery order. My overall mpg since yesterday when I reset my trip meter is at 55.2 mpg, which also makes me super happy. I haven’t got up in the 50s at all yet since I got this car. I was so excited about it I forgot to turn my car off which happens more frequently than I would like to admit. :) I’m so happy I stumbled onto this forum!
 

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My screen said I averaged 70.2 mpg on my 10 mile drive home that included 1 stop to pick up my grocery order. My overall mpg since yesterday when I reset my trip meter is at 55.2 mpg, which also makes me super happy. I haven’t got up in the 50s at all yet since I got this car. I was so excited about it I forgot to turn my car off which happens more frequently than I would like to admit. :) I’m so happy I stumbled onto this forum!
Congrats on the mpg gains... and what hybrid owners call "hyper-miling." :) It gets a little addictive to do better, knowing that your driving and selections affect your fuel economy.

Two more threads/links related to topics you've mentioned, in case you're interested:
 

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@NicoleK - I'll wear mittens in the winter, but I'll be damned if I'll sweat in the heat of summer! I have found cabin heat to be more of a MPG hit than A/C as heat requires the engine to run more frequently since the coolant is the source of the heat. The A/C is electric, so once the desired temp's neighborhood it hit, it's just a matter of keeping it there - which isn't that difficult for the Insight's cooling system. I run mine at 65 all the time in summer and can still put up some great numbers. I suppose, if you set it to "LO," it would run constantly and be an issue. I believe "LO" is less than 54 degrees. Who wants to wear a ski parka while driving in summer anyways?
 

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I suppose, if you set it to "LO," it would run constantly and be an issue. I believe "LO" is less than 54 degrees. Who wants to wear a ski parka while driving in summer anyways?
The minimum / 'lo' setting is <59F. My 'theory' is that this lowest temperature setting corresponds to the low-end threshold for HV battery operating conditions (?). The low setting is only an energy drain when climate control is run on auto; I use the low setting but control the system manually and/or use passive cooling.
 

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With outside temperatures around 105 (just a little too hot for this Las Vegas High School graduate: )) my guess is that the cooler the interior gets the lower the mpg will be. I'm thinking that it takes energy to pump all that heat out of the cabin and that the energy needed to do the job, ultimately impacts mpg - independent of the climate control system settings..(Although the amount of mpg hit is much much less because of current AC tech.).

Nicole's short drives (2 miles and 10 miles) will negatively impact mpg as it gets colder, especially as the engine runs longer to warm-up enough for EV light-on operation. So I'd look for super high mpg on some trips and some very low mpg on others. A tankful to tankful in the mid 50's mpg would be better than around 2/3's of Insight owners (per my reading of the graph at fuelly.com), a big improvement over the starting mpg in the 40's, and an indicator of the usefulness of the great information provided above.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
New question! I’d like some recommendations on products to use the clean the interior please. Dash, doors, console, seats, etc. I have a touring with black interior. I used a damp cloth on my previous car but there must be products I can use that are better than just water. I’ve gotten such great advice on this forum so far! Looking forward to more. Thank you in advance!
 

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New question! I’d like some recommendations on products to use the clean the interior please. Dash, doors, console, seats, etc. I have a touring with black interior. I used a damp cloth on my previous car but there must be products I can use that are better than just water. I’ve gotten such great advice on this forum so far! Looking forward to more. Thank you in advance!
Below are some threads from our "Interior" sub-forum.
There are also exterior cleaning suggestions in our "Exterior" sub-forum. You can use the
5804
icon in the upper right corner to navigate to these and other sub-forums for additional content.
 
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