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2019 OWP Insight EX
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I didn't know about this:

"On a cold day, you don't need the heater. Just set the climate control to HI and turn it off. The ducts stay open, and warm air flows into the cabin. Driving in 30-to-40-degree weather, I didn't even need a jacket in the car. In fact, I had to turn it down because I was getting too warm in the sun.

I tried it on the way to work this morning. It works as advertised!
 

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I didn't know about this:

"On a cold day, you don't need the heater. Just set the climate control to HI and turn it off. The ducts stay open, and warm air flows into the cabin. Driving in 30-to-40-degree weather, I didn't even need a jacket in the car. In fact, I had to turn it down because I was getting too warm in the sun.

I tried it on the way to work this morning. It works as advertised!
If front windshield defrosting is needed too, any idea if this will work without fans? Or would this tip be just for interior cabin warmth?
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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If front windshield defrosting is needed too, any idea if this will work without fans? Or would this tip be just for interior cabin warmth?
In the MT review, air passively flowed through the vents. I would assume the vents in question would be the last ones used prior to turning the system off, so defrost should work. The only downside is that defrost needs the A/C operating to remove humidity - which doesn't happen in the passive scenario. I'm making the assumption it's for cabin heat only.
 

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Outside air in via the vents

How do you get the outside air to flow into the interior via the vents without turning on the A/C? Day time temps are in low to mid 60s here and with the sun warming the interior of my EX Insight, it's confusing how to do this. The controls are not very intuitive in my opinion.
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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How do you get the outside air to flow into the interior via the vents without turning on the A/C? Day time temps are in low to mid 60s here and with the sun warming the interior of my EX Insight, it's confusing how to do this. The controls are not very intuitive in my opinion.
Set the temp where you want it and press the a/c button (use "low" for outside air temp). The screen will indicate a/c off.
 

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2019 Honda Insight EX (White Orchid Pearl)
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I didn't know about this:

"On a cold day, you don't need the heater. Just set the climate control to HI and turn it off. The ducts stay open, and warm air flows into the cabin. Driving in 30-to-40-degree weather, I didn't even need a jacket in the car. In fact, I had to turn it down because I was getting too warm in the sun.

I tried it on the way to work this morning. It works as advertised!
I'm kind of confused on how to do this. The right knob is to control fan speed and the left knob is to control the temperature. Where is this "Hi" climate control?
 

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I'm kind of confused on how to do this. The right knob is to control fan speed and the left knob is to control the temperature. Where is this "Hi" climate control?
It's managed by the left knob for temperature setting. You'll see "HI" when you max out the temperature setting by turning to the right (and "LO" when you minimize it by turning to the left).
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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It's managed by the left knob for temperature setting. You'll see "HI" when you max out the temperature setting by turning to the right (and "LO" when you minimize it by turning to the left).
For temp setting, this is what you do. If you want to refine which vents are open, set them manually along with the temperature, then hit "off."

I can't wait until next winter to see if I can drive without mittens (because I'm too cheap to engage cabin heat)!
 

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2019 Honda Insight EX (White Orchid Pearl)
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I guessing this works because the wind is blowing the engine heat into the cabin as I'm driving instead of needing the fan to be on?
 

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Fall has arrived in my neck-of-the-woods, with hi/lo temperatures dropping 10-15 F versus a week ago. Cabin heating is supported by more run time for the gas engine, so colder temps mean less fuel efficiency.

Thought I'd bump this thread to remind myself (and others!) of the comment from Motor Trend on passive cabin heating. The idea is to set the temperature setting to "HI" then turning off the cabin fan. The cabin benefits from (passive) warm air flow without unduly triggering the gas engine to run and maintain the cabin temperature.

It works well for fall weather, but I can see needing to run the fan in cooler temps for defrosting and comfort. I also like a certain amount of air flow to avoid feeling carsick in stale air, so I still plan to let the fan run occasionally / strategically. :)
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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Fall has arrived in my neck-of-the-woods, with hi/lo temperatures dropping 10-15 F versus a week ago. Cabin heating is supported by more run time for the gas engine, so colder temps mean less fuel efficiency.

Thought I'd bump this thread to remind myself (and others!) of the comment from Motor Trend on passive cabin heating. The idea is to set the temperature setting to "HI" then turning off the cabin fan. The cabin benefits from (passive) warm air flow without unduly triggering the gas engine to run and maintain the cabin temperature.

It works well for fall weather, but I can see needing to run the fan in cooler temps for defrosting and comfort. I also like a certain amount of air flow to avoid feeling carsick in stale air, so I still plan to let the fan run occasionally / strategically. :)
And don't forget the mittens!
 

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Re-tried the passive heating technique today. Observed the following:
  • Cabin was comfortable (enough) - not overly warm, but not overly cold without needing to wear a a jacket (or mittens) while driving.
  • "Steady driving" provides more benefit more from this passive technique than stop/go driving (like my commute this morning).
  • Back windshield fogged up. It's such a small back window that I've gotten used to using my side mirrors and other resources, but it was an undesired effect. The more steady driving I did, the less foggy the back window got.
  • Turning off cabin heat definitely helped mpg and battery charging/discharging levels. Got 80 mpg on my drive in, matching spring/summer mpg results in 40's F weather. (Best-ever for this daily drive which includes a downhill section is 97 mpg; average is 65-75 mpg.) HV battery also let me use it below 4 bars before triggering re-charge.
  • No engine 'misfire' (under hood vibration while car is idling) occurred, since cabin heating didn't run.
Any tips for maintaining this passive technique, but avoiding fogging of back window?
 

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2019 OWP Insight EX
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Re-tried the passive heating technique today. Observed the following:
  • Cabin was comfortable (enough) - not overly warm, but not overly cold without needing to wear a a jacket (or mittens) while driving.
  • "Steady driving" provides more benefit more from this passive technique than stop/go driving (like my commute this morning).
  • Back windshield fogged up. It's such a small back window that I've gotten used to using my side mirrors and other resources, but it was an undesired effect. The more steady driving I did, the less foggy the back window got.
  • Turning off cabin heat definitely helped mpg and battery charging/discharging levels. Got 80 mpg on my drive in, matching spring/summer mpg results in 40's F weather. (Best-ever for this daily drive which includes a downhill section is 97 mpg; average is 65-75 mpg.) HV battery also let me use it below 4 bars before triggering re-charge.
Any tips for maintaining this passive technique, but avoiding fogging of back window?
You can always kick on the rear defogger for a minute or two. At least that won't trip the ICE like cabin heat does.
 

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You can always kick on the rear defogger for a minute or two. At least that won't trip the ICE like cabin heat does.
I find the rear-defogger to be so slow, but that's just me. Granted for the 2+ years prior I was driving a truck that never seemed to have any rear window fog. Anyone else think that it's slow (as in 10+minutes before you get cleared lines through the fog?)
 

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Years ago, before cars came with embedded heating elements in the back window I used to use an after market low tech fog eliminator.. It consisted of a thick clear plastic sheet (think Saran Wrap but thick and transparent) that you would cut to fit the back window and some double sided foam weather strip material that you would use to hold the plastic onto the back window. The space between the plastic sheeting and glass contained about 1/8'th inch of air that acted as an insulator so the the moist inside cabin air never contacted the cold glass. In essence, this was a form fitted storm window. The cabin air warmed the plastic so there was never any fogging on my back window. I have not seen this on the market for many years now but it would be pretty easy to duplicate it with materials from a local hardware store. The built in rear defogger would never be used with this add on in place but the down side would be the ugly factor.
 

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You can always kick on the rear defogger for a minute or two. At least that won't trip the ICE like cabin heat does.
Do you experience this rear-window fogging issue? Or is your 1 hour drive at a steady enough speed that there's enough passive air flow thru vents to prevent fogging?
 

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2019 Honda Insight EX (White Orchid Pearl)
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Cleaning the interior glass can help with reducing fog. I haven't really paid much attention to the Insight's rear defogger but my previous cars allowed me to control how fast the rear defogger operate.
 

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Do you experience this rear-window fogging issue? Or is your 1 hour drive at a steady enough speed that there's enough passive air flow thru vents to prevent fogging?
It all depends on the RH%. In general, the windows clears in 5-10 minutes if it does fog initially. I'm always moving, so passive heat seems to work well for me. Like @andrew28 stated, cleaning the window itself is a good place to start.
 
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