Gen 3 Insight Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My fill-up tonight resulted in my best tank so far.

604 miles: 69.2mpg indicated / 69.3mpg actual

This is also the highest range estimate I've gotten. As long as temps are in the 50s or better, I believe I've managed to crack 70mpg on my 100-mile work round trip reliably.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
My fill-up tonight resulted in my best tank so far.

604 miles: 69.2mpg indicated / 69.3mpg actual

This is also the highest range estimate I've gotten. As long as temps are in the 50s or better, I believe I've managed to crack 70mpg on my 100-mile work round trip reliably.
hasarad, how are you achieving those fantastic numbers? A 100 mile R/T has got to be highway as you can't be driving through the city as I would think that would take forever. Are you driving in basically STANDARD mode? If so, what speed are you driving at - a lot of EV I'm assuming? Nevertheless GREAT JOB!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Impressive!
I as well have a 100 mile RT each day.
Waze usually has me go 50/50 hwy and city.
IMO these cars like to cruise in traffic or city streets better than the open hwy.
My best is 59.9 so far.


Hey Hasarad, what psi are you running in your tires?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
808 - I'm running at 40psi on all four corners.

The drive is rolling country roads with an average 45mph speed. I am 100% in ECO mode. Other than a few traffic lights a a couple stop signs, there is never any traffic. I keep trip A (reset to ignition off) in front of me and mentally set a few waypoints to try to beat during the trip. I've steadily been creeping up in mileage since a familiar drive makes things easier to anticipate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Very impressive. I'm at the opposite end of the Fuelly bell curve for the 72 EX Insights registered in Fuelly. A lot of my driving includes highway speeds of 82-84 mph through Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming where the posted speed limit is 80 mph. I also started my Fuelly stats in late November which was the start of a cold winter here in Eastern Washington. In town with the current warmer weather though, I am getting 55 mpg or so which is the EPA number. Very happy with overall gas mileage considering my circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Agreed, most impressive! It's amazing how the Insight guides us toward a more efficient driving style that best suits its powertrain. But I am getting nowhere near those numbers yet. I was in the mid-40s with my first two tanks and will crack 50 on my current tank after about two months of owning the Insight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
@gremal, did you ever buy new wheels? Lighter wheels are definitely on my list of things I'm dying to try, along with a speaker replacement. Would think that lighter wheels mean less torque and improved fuel efficiency.

My last tank was 54.6 MPG, which made me really proud, considering the elevation changes along my route to and from work (see attachment). Unfortunately my current tank will probably only just break 50 MPG. I left the car on overnight and it burned half a gallon just sitting there. :(
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
My last tank was 54.6 MPG, which made me really proud, considering the elevation changes along my route to and from work (see attachment). Unfortunately my current tank will probably only just break 50 MPG. I left the car on overnight and it burned half a gallon just sitting there. :( Attached Thumbnails What did you use to get your elevation graph?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Anyone live in California and taken a drive up to Reno, NV (4,506'), or Lake Tahoe (6,225) in their Insight? I'm wondering if the engine will just CONTINUOUSLY ROAR proceeding up to those elevations. If I start here in San Francisco (52') I'm thinking I'd be in for a long, howling ride and the MPG will tank, however coming back down It'll probably get +150 MPG!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
Anyone live in California and taken a drive up to Reno, NV (4,506'), or Lake Tahoe (6,225) in their Insight? I'm wondering if the engine will just CONTINUOUSLY ROAR proceeding up to those elevations. If I start here in San Francisco (52') I'm thinking I'd be in for a long, howling ride and the MPG will tank, however coming back down It'll probably get +150 MPG!
The Insight does struggle with altitude. Most of the time, it's a series hybrid where the engine just drives a generator, but at high speeds and high loads, a clutch locks the engine to the wheels. In L.A., accelerating onto the freeway and passing at freeway speeds was slow but not bad. At altitude (6,000 feet at the Grand Canyon), the limitations of the little electric motor and little gasoline engine are apparent, and that's with one person aboard.


The Insight is extremely sensitive to powertrain loads. With Econ mode on and the climate, cruise, active safety, and infotainment systems off and driving gently at 60 to 70 mph, I did 480 miles on a tank going from sea level to 6,000 feet. On the way back down, with all those systems on and cruise set to 80 mph, I did 380 miles on a tank. That's a huge swing depending on how hard the engine has to work. https://www.motortrend.com/cars/honda/insight/2019/2019-honda-insight-ex-long-term-update-1-review/
Motortrend recently did a review on the Insight about elevation changes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,315 Posts
What did you use to get your elevation graph?
There might be other options, but one way is to use the "walking" estimate on Google maps in PC web browser. Drag the walking route to match/overlay the driving route if they suggest different paths.

After mapping the terrain for daily drive, I learned my great inbound mpg (55-75 mpg, depending on temp) is helped by a 600 ft elevation drop; I pay some of it back when climbing back on the same return route (35-45 mpg), but still net better-than-average overall mpg. This terrain difference seemed less noticeable in non-hybrid drives I've made on same route, but after owning the Insight I've learned terrain can be a big help/hurt to mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Anyone live in California and taken a drive up to Reno, NV (4,506'), or Lake Tahoe (6,225) in their Insight? I'm wondering if the engine will just CONTINUOUSLY ROAR proceeding up to those elevations. If I start here in San Francisco (52') I'm thinking I'd be in for a long, howling ride and the MPG will tank, however coming back down It'll probably get +150 MPG!
I haven't done that ride in the Insight (did it in my '06 Civic, including in white-out snowy conditions where I briefly got stuck, and those mountains are impressive for sure). But I did ride a week ago up and down Mount Tam to get to Muir Beach. There is of course a lot of fuel required to go uphill but the advantage of going downhill for long distances isn't as dramatic as I thought. I think you'll find that's the case if you drive to Tahoe. But you'll get a lot better mileage than non-hybrid vehicles, especially if you allow yourself to be strategic about how fast you take the grades.

@gremal, did you ever buy new wheels? Lighter wheels are definitely on my list of things I'm dying to try, along with a speaker replacement. Would think that lighter wheels mean less torque and improved fuel efficiency.
I don't think wheel weight is as clear-cut an issue--definitely not the same as weight elsewhere in the vehicle. Maybe it takes more torque to get heavier wheels moving from a stop, but less torque to keep them moving, and more resistance to slow them (which can actually improve mileage in the Insight because resistance charges the battery). In any case, I think the differences are negligible for most drivers.

To answer your question, I have not yet gotten the Mugen wheels. I don't think they are lighter than the 16" EX wheels but they are definitely lighter than the 17" Touring wheels. If I get them it won't be because of weight but aesthetic preference. I'm having a tough time figuring out which ones are specific for the Insight, as there seems to be a very similar wheel made for the Mugen-ized Oddesey.

My last tank was 54.6 MPG, which made me really proud, considering the elevation changes along my route to and from work (see attachment). Unfortunately my current tank will probably only just break 50 MPG. I left the car on overnight and it burned half a gallon just sitting there. :(
I left mine on for a couple hours at Muir beach. I couldn't believe I walked away while it was still running. I had turned it off but then turned it back on to roll up the rear windows, and forgot to turn it off after that. Still, I'm getting over 52 mpg on my tank--the first time I'll get more than 50 in the two months I've been driving the Insight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
What did you use to get your elevation graph?
There might be other options, but one way is to use the "walking" estimate on Google maps in PC web browser. Drag the walking route to match/overlay the driving route if they suggest different paths.
I used the bicycling directions in Google Maps, but the walking directions give what looks like the same plot. My route is 20 miles long.

I don't think wheel weight is as clear-cut an issue--definitely not the same as weight elsewhere in the vehicle. Maybe it takes more torque to get heavier wheels moving from a stop, but less torque to keep them moving, and more resistance to slow them (which can actually improve mileage in the Insight because resistance charges the battery). In any case, I think the differences are negligible for most drivers.
Agree that it is a little more complicated. I remember an earlier discussion in one of the spare tire threads, wherein the theory was that omitting the spare tire was a weight savings that Honda used to goose the MPG. But like others, when I put in my spare tire, I was hard-pressed to observe any fuel efficiency decrease. That's a permanent ~20 lb weight. And at any rate my passengers weigh 5X-8X that.

The regenerative braking does charge the battery, but the battery's charge also comes from running in series mode (when the ICE charges the battery). Not sure what fraction of the charge I use comes from gas vs. recovered energy from braking.

To answer your question, I have not yet gotten the Mugen wheels. I don't think they are lighter than the 16" EX wheels but they are definitely lighter than the 17" Touring wheels. If I get them it won't be because of weight but aesthetic preference. I'm having a tough time figuring out which ones are specific for the Insight, as there seems to be a very similar wheel made for the Mugen-ized Oddesey.
I really wish I knew what I was talking about when it came to wheels. If I do get this done I'll probably lean on the guys at Costco.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
This may have been shared before (apologies if so). It's a nifty way to calculate gas savings by comparing the mileage of two different cars. Depending on how much you drive, how many years you own a car, how expensive gas gets and the mileage of other cars you are considering (in my case the Civic), it becomes easy to justify the purchase of the Insight.


https://www.carmax.com/research/mpg-calculator
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
This may have been shared before (apologies if so). It's a nifty way to calculate gas savings by comparing the mileage of two different cars. Depending on how much you drive, how many years you own a car, how expensive gas gets and the mileage of other cars you are considering (in my case the Civic), it becomes easy to justify the purchase of the Insight.


https://www.carmax.com/research/mpg-calculator
I am saving around $1100 a year in gas!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
70.4

I filled up again today. I never thought I'd break 70. You gotta believe!
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,315 Posts
The drive is rolling country roads with an average 45mph speed. I am 100% in ECO mode. Other than a few traffic lights a a couple stop signs, there is never any traffic. I keep trip A (reset to ignition off) in front of me and mentally set a few waypoints to try to beat during the trip. I've steadily been creeping up in mileage since a familiar drive makes things easier to anticipate.
Warmer weather is awesome for sure! I'm getting similar % gains (+17%) since colder weather, but will never get 70 mpg round trip due to a long hill that's part of my daily commute.

My only 'complaint' about warmer weather is that it's changing my mileage waypoints during a drive. Battery level and ICE usage were very predictable and consistent in cold weather, but new drive rules seem needed for warm weather.

As an example:
- in warm weather, the car starts in EV and depletes HV battery before reaching the cold weather waypoint; ICE starts mid-drive to rebuild battery and is noticeable because I hear the ICE run due to battery <3-4 bars in sections that used to be 'quiet' drive stretches.
- in cold weather, the car starts with ICE and builds some extra HV battery before the cold weather waypoint; ICE then turns off from there point forward to consume HV battery.

Overall, the warmer weather and higher EV engagement is generating more mpg, but I'm re-learning new benchmarks and strategies to match warm-weather battery management to upcoming terrain in my drive.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top