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Hi everyone,

I’m familiar with the one-pedal or “ePedal” design of EVs which apply can apply heavy regenerative braking as soon as the driver takes his/her foot off the accelerator. This has the notable advantage of greatly reducing brake wear …

What I don’t understand is why (at least in Eco mode), the amount of regenerative braking specified by the steering wheel paddles only applies to a single braking event. What is the logic behind that? Is there any way to get the setting to “stick”? (I seem to remember reading somewhere that the setting is retained in Sport mode, but that kind of defeats the purpose).
 

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The setting is only retained in Sport mode.

I use the regen paddles on long downhills instead of the brake pedal to keep speed down, or on long leadups to a stop. I consider it a "pre-brake," although it does the same as the brake pedal (lightly) save for the last few miles an hour to a stop or emergency stopping.
 
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What I don’t understand is why (at least in Eco mode), the amount of regenerative braking specified by the steering wheel paddles only applies to a single braking event. What is the logic behind that? Is there any way to get the setting to “stick”? (I seem to remember reading somewhere that the setting is retained in Sport mode, but that kind of defeats the purpose).
My take on this is that Honda's objective was to deliver a hybrid car that drives like a 'normal' car, similar to their approach to 'normal' looking exterior styling. The normalcy makes it an easier point-of-entry for people new to hybrids/EVs, because the car drives like a traditional model (versus feeling like a golf cart with excessive regen).

In Econ and Normal modes, the regen level turns off after ~3 seconds of acceleration or braking, or when cruise control is resumed.
Note however, that even though you aren't selecting 'chevron' levels, you do get regeneration from initial travel of the brake pedal. (Friction braking doesn't kick in until <5-10 mph or emergency braking.)

@Wifey'sInsight also noticed in this "Paddles vs Brakes" thread that if the regen level is set while in Sport mode, switching out of Sport into another mode keeps the regen level active (even with acceleration) until the car slows to <5 mph. While this will take some extra button pushing, you may want to try this out to see if it meets a 'middle ground' for you in regen management.

Honda's algorithms for Econ and Normal mode already favor regeneration with slower throttle response, while Sport mode favors ICE operation and power delivery. Since fuel efficiency isn't the primary objective for Sport mode, I think the 'sticky' regen level is offered for Sport mode as an offset if/when the driver chooses.
 

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From my understanding, the purpose of "sticky" regeneration in sport mode is to prioritize battery charging. Contrary to popular belief, Sport mode has the most aggressive regeneration algorithms, while Econ has the least.

Econ prioritizes minimal ICE engagement, best for "stop and go" traffic and lower speeds.

Normal balances ICE engagement with battery regeneration, and at set speeds will switch from load activated EV, to a charge/discharge cycle.

Sport mode Maximizes the use of both ICE and EV motors for propulsion, and will keep the ICE on much longer to recharge back to 80%+. after discharge (acceleration).

Sport mode is the least fuel efficient because it will engage the ICE for charging far more than the other driving modes. Econ Mode will engage the ICE for the purpose of charging the least.
 

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From my understanding, the purpose of "sticky" regeneration in sport mode is to prioritize battery charging. Contrary to popular belief, Sport mode has the most aggressive regeneration algorithms, while Econ has the least.
I see what you mean... I think of "regeneration" as free energy (e.g. passive capture of kinetic energy) and "generation" as created energy (e.g. ICE/generator). Should I re-define how I think about it, as both being regenerative?

Both deliver the end goal of bringing up high voltage battery charge, but I like taking advantage of more of the 'free' stuff. :)
 

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I see what you mean... I think of "regeneration" as free energy (e.g. passive capture of kinetic energy) and "generation" as created energy (e.g. ICE/generator). Should I re-define how I think about it, as both being regenerative?

Both deliver the end goal of bringing up high voltage battery charge, but I like taking advantage of more of the 'free' stuff. :)
You are more accurate, my post was ambiguous of the difference of energy creation. It would have read more accurately had I stated that:

Sport mode has the most aggressive algorithms for charging the battery, both passively and actively. Sport mode actively employs the battery/ICE combination for acceleration, and is the most aggressive for ICE-charging scenarios. While sport mode will most definitely engage ICE/EV combination for acceleration, it'll also force ICE charging, at low to medium throttle, depending on battery percentage, much more actively than Eco/Normal driving.

Back to the OP, I always double click the left paddle, and will modulate regeneration with the accelerator if I'm slowing too quickly for the situation. I'd much rather have to reduce the rate at which I'm slowing, than force the car to use the mechanical brakes whenever I get the chance. In my ideal world, I'd be able to coast between traffic lights, allowing enough time for the light to switch back to green before coming to a complete stop.
 
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