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Have only had my Insight for the last month. Not sure what others experience is but for myself, when driving on the highway the vehicle drives better and gets better milage. Does better on hills also....... The drone from the engine is far less pronounced.
I've also found my mpg improves on highway - depending on speed! If I keep it within the 60 mph range, I can get at or above the 49 mpg highway EPA rating. Pushing speed to 70+ I can see in the 'immediate mpg' gauge and average mpg total the loss in fuel efficiency.

Hills are still tough going at city speeds though, unless I anticipate them with momentum built up by accelerating before the hill, OR unless I switch to Sport mode. Do you do most of your hill-driving in city or highway conditions?

Most of my hills are semi rural........ So speeds are around 80kph.
 

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Good question regarding downhills, what happens when the battery is fully charged and the car is trying to charge it further (due to braking or gravity push from a down grade(? I don't know the answer. I've been in that situation only once and it was for just a few seconds (coming down the West slope of the Coast Range). What happened, was that the engine was off, I was near the bottom of a long steep downgrade at about 62 mph approaching a "slow to 40" right turn. I tapped the brakes and as I slowed the engine came on. I took the corner at 50 mph, tapped the throttle coming out of the corner. EV green icon came on and I accelerated to 60 mph. Followed by a long period of battery only operation at around 60 mph. = top mpg to balance out all the gas and rpm used to climb the East slope.
One of my first joy rides was through the Catskill Mountains up 28 to Delhi and back 23A to Catskill, over the RVW Bridge and back home. The car was fairly new, and it was cold in the high 20's. Gas mileage was not great until I passed Hunter Mt., and came back out of the mountains down the long decent. The battery reached full coming down and kept showing that it was charging. I wondered how much longer can this thing charge? But when I finally reached the bottom, it ran on battery for a long time. At that time I used Sport Mode going up the mountains, and Econ Mode once out of the mountains. Got 50 MPG total trip in cold weather. Probably could have gotten more if I ran Normal Mode coming back home, but 50 for final return home after all that hill climbing seemed pretty good.

So maybe the battery stored more than usual, and the payback with all the work it did to get up those hills was returned with battery reserve. I'll have to try that again with Sport Mode and Normal Mode in warmer weather. I bet it will be much better results.

Phil
 

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Your answer is "it depends." If you have a ton of battery reserve and you never exceed the lower half of the blue power band, you might make it. Your odds are much greater if the engine is already warm. You'll need to take your time getting up to speed in any event. If there's a hill involved, your odds go down dramatically. If the engine is already warm, sufficient battery reserve exists, you select EV mode and keep the power meter in the blue, you will likely make it unless there's a mountain in front of you.
Thanks Hasarad, It is flat terrain in the Rio Grande Valley. I am in this case just driving in my gated community so I have light foot on the go pedal. I usually use my golf cart or bike for this trip. The engine is cold when I do this, I know these short trips are not good for the gas engine, not sure about battery. I just leave the car in EV mode here due to no hills.
 

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Have only had my Insight for the last month. Not sure what others experience is but for myself, when driving on the highway the vehicle drives better and gets better milage in SPORT mode. Does better on hills also....... The drone from the engine is far less pronounced than when in ECO.
Why???


Sport mode will use more gas to charge up and maintain the battery at a higher SOC, giving you more power at a lower rpm, especially during a hill climb. Helpful perhaps for hill climbing and maintaining freeway speeds. But I suspect the mpg impact to be negligible (the engine must work more in Sport to build and maintain the higher SOC). Secondly the reduced amount of throttle pedal pressure needed to maintain freeway speeds should be noticeably reduced in Sport.



Yesterday I drove for 1.5 miles with the cruise control set at 42 mph. While cruising (with foot off of the throttle pedal) I pushed the ECON button to off, and then the Sport button to on. The car just cruised along as if I hadn't done anything.
 

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sport mode will use more gas to charge up and maintain the battery at a higher soc, giving you more power at a lower rpm, especially during a hill climb. Helpful perhaps for hill climbing and maintaining freeway speeds. But i suspect the mpg impact to be negligible (the engine must work more in sport to build and maintain the higher soc). Secondly the reduced amount of throttle pedal pressure needed to maintain freeway speeds should be noticeably reduced in sport.
Once at highway speed where the engine is solely propelling the car, I don't think the hybrid mode selection matters any longer. These "real world testing results" suggest you get roughly the same result between modes when driving under highway conditions.
 

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Good question regarding downhills, what happens when the battery is fully charged and the car is trying to charge it further (due to braking or gravity push from a down grade(? I don't know the answer. I've been in that situation only once and it was for just a few seconds (coming down the West slope of the Coast Range).
It was discussed in an earlier thread, way back somewhere, but I know from experience what happens because it happens every day I drive on 15. If the battery's full while regen braking is on, the energy gets dumped into the ICE engine, making a loud noise. The noise subsides as you bleed off the extra momentum.
 

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What I am curious about though is the latter - going downhill. What happens when the battery is at a high state of charge and you have a steep, long grade to go down? Is there enough engine braking to keep you from having to use the brakes (I assume this would be done with the paddle shifters)??
It was discussed in an earlier thread, way back somewhere, but I know from experience what happens because it happens every day I drive on 15. If the battery's full while regen braking is on, the energy gets dumped into the ICE engine, making a loud noise. The noise subsides as you bleed off the extra momentum.
The forum isn't easy to search (e.g. ICE), but I think you're referencing this post from hasarad in the "what issues are you having..." thread. His description was good at the time, and still stands as a very helpful explanation!
 

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So I did open the air intake filter box and stick the clips under the filter and I really feel the difference in power even going up hills I feel it has more power and torque and the engine doesn't have to push more but the engine nose get louder when you step on it hard but with more power
No disrespect, but are you sure you're really feeling a performance difference or is the deep sound of rushing air just making it appear as if the car has more power? What you did is very similar to what we use to do back in the day by flipping the air cleaner cover upside down to allow more air into the intake by way of the carb. The deep "Varoom" sound really made it really feel like you had a **** on wheels hot rod, where in reality it was just a lot of noise.... of course that's just my opinion :surprise:
 

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Thanks everyone! Have filled up a couple of times now and seem to be averaging just over 49 mpg overall. Given that a lot of my commute is 70mph, it appears to be inline with the EPA ratings and I'm happy with that!

The "transmission" (or whatever it is) is taking some getting used to. At first, I was playing with Sport mode and planning ahead to charge the battery for hills on the commute and help reduce the high RPM engine noise.. Eventually, I just decided to let the car do its thing in Normal mode and it doesn't really bother me as much anymore. Im just past the break-in period for the engine, so I can finally "give it the beans" in Sport mode (when I get back from this conference, that is).

I do like the car so far and am impressed, particularly for the money. :)
It's funny you mention about the transmission. I'm still adjusting to it reving so high with minimal pushing on the accelerator (I mainly drive in Eco mode). Then again, it's only been 2 weeks since I've taken ownership.
 

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It's funny you mention about the transmission. I'm still adjusting to it reving so high with minimal pushing on the accelerator (I mainly drive in Eco mode). Then again, it's only been 2 weeks since I've taken ownership.
Try keeping an eye toward maximizing high voltage battery level (left indicator) to anticipate how hard the gas engine will work, and as a reminder to take advantage of regeneration (hills, braking) when possible to build battery level. Occasional use of Sport mode also helps to build battery quickly in a short(er) amount of time, because it's algorithm seems to prioritize maintaining battery level/power. (I turn it on when I know a hill is coming up, but I'm at the low-end of battery level.)

High battery level translates to more fuel efficiency due to more availability of battery/EV for power and less gas engine use. The gas engine labors less when battery level is >3-4 bars. Being above 3-4 bars of battery isn't always possible, BUT when you see the battery level falls into that range, you can know and anticipate that the gas engine will be working harder to power the car and re-build battery level.

Being able to anticipate when the engine will run at higher rpms helped me get comfortable with how the car works. Hope it helps you too!
 

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Try keeping an eye toward maximizing high voltage battery level (left indicator) to anticipate how hard the gas engine will work, and as a reminder to take advantage of regeneration (hills, braking) when possible to build battery level. Occasional use of Sport mode also helps to build battery quickly in a short(er) amount of time, because it's algorithm seems to prioritize maintaining battery level/power. (I turn it on when I know a hill is coming up, but I'm at the low-end of battery level.)

High battery level translates to more fuel efficiency due to more availability of battery/EV for power and less gas engine use. The gas engine labors less when battery level is >3-4 bars. Being above 3-4 bars of battery isn't always possible, BUT when you see the battery level falls into that range, you can know and anticipate that the gas engine will be working harder to power the car and re-build battery level.

Being able to anticipate when the engine will run at higher rpms helped me get comfortable with how the car works. Hope it helps you too!
Make sense. Thanks for the information, it definitely gives me a better understanding. I'll definitely try to apply this since I go through a lot of rolling hills on the highway. I'm already always maximizing the brake regen with the paddles when possible, with more preference with doing that rather than pressing the brake pedal.
 

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Hi!

I'm currently contemplating getting this car, but reading through this thread has me a bit worried. Just to revive some of this discussion, for owners that have had this car for longer, how big of a nuisance is getting used to/dealing with the nature of this hybrid setup.

I live in a pretty flat region, so I don't have to deal with steep climbs, but I'm still worried that after regular day to day driving I will start hating the car :p. I did test drive it once and found it quirky :) but not necessarily bothersome, but that was before reading through the forum.. I guess I'm just trying to understand what the learning curve was for most people, and whether you still enjoy driving the Insight. Also, for anyone that lives in colder climates, how does it handle in the winter?

Thanks!
 

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I'm currently contemplating getting this car, but reading through this thread has me a bit worried. Just to revive some of this discussion, for owners that have had this car for longer, how big of a nuisance is getting used to/dealing with the nature of this hybrid setup.

I live in a pretty flat region, so I don't have to deal with steep climbs, but I'm still worried that after regular day to day driving I will start hating the car :p. I did test drive it once and found it quirky :) but not necessarily bothersome, but that was before reading through the forum.. I guess I'm just trying to understand what the learning curve was for most people, and whether you still enjoy driving the Insight. Also, for anyone that lives in colder climates, how does it handle in the winter?
The Insight is my first hybrid, and I've found it a good entry point for a transition from a traditional car. I intentionally took the car up several hills during my test drive and at the end concluded "it's not that bad; I can live with it." The gas pedal felt a little golf-cart-like initially, but is generally easy to adapt to.

Depending on your current car, the bigger learning curve on the Insight could be learning to use the Honda Sensing and other features. But I liked that I could drive the car 'normally' and learn these features gradually/incrementally. There's a learning curve to the Insight if you're looking to eke out every drop of mpg efficiency, but it also delivers reasonably good fuel efficiency even when you're note trying - especially in city driving (<45-50 mph). On highways, the gas engine (ICE) runs more and the fuel efficiency suffers over speeds of ~70 mph.

The engine is most 'noisy' when the HV battery level drops to 3-4 bars. The gas engine kicks in to both power the car and rebuild HV battery level, which can sound like a lot of 'effort.' The cabin is normally very quiet, so I think the effect is (over)amplified because of the difference.

Hybrids generally run better in warmer weather, averaging a 25-35% hit in winter versus summer mpg. I think the OEM tires have handled well in all-season conditions, and others have found that with snow tires, the Insight performs well.

Here are some threads for additional reading/reference to your questions:
Engine Noise - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...l-discussion/494-engine-noise-complaints.html
Insight on Mountains (engine sound)- https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...everydaydriver-2019-honda-insight-review.html
Insight in Snow - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...on/574-winter-tire-strategy-insight-snow.html
 

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The Insight is my first hybrid, and I've found it a good entry point for a transition from a traditional car. I intentionally took the car up several hills during my test drive and at the end concluded "it's not that bad; I can live with it." The gas pedal felt a little golf-cart-like initially, but is generally easy to adapt to.

Depending on your current car, the bigger learning curve on the Insight could be learning to use the Honda Sensing and other features. But I liked that I could drive the car 'normally' and learn these features gradually/incrementally. There's a learning curve to the Insight if you're looking to eke out every drop of mpg efficiency, but it also delivers reasonably good fuel efficiency even when you're note trying - especially in city driving (<45-50 mph). On highways, the gas engine (ICE) runs more and the fuel efficiency suffers over speeds of ~70 mph.

The engine is most 'noisy' when the HV battery level drops to 3-4 bars. The gas engine kicks in to both power the car and rebuild HV battery level, which can sound like a lot of 'effort.' The cabin is normally very quiet, so I think the effect is (over)amplified because of the difference.

Hybrids generally run better in warmer weather, averaging a 25-35% hit in winter versus summer mpg. I think the OEM tires have handled well in all-season conditions, and others have found that with snow tires, the Insight performs well.

Here are some threads for additional reading/reference to your questions:
Engine Noise - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...l-discussion/494-engine-noise-complaints.html
Insight on Mountains (engine sound)- https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...everydaydriver-2019-honda-insight-review.html
Insight in Snow - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/1...on/574-winter-tire-strategy-insight-snow.html

Thanks a lot! I'm going to do another test drive this weekend to re-evaluate. Anything else I should keep an eye on?
 

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Thanks a lot! I'm going to do another test drive this weekend to re-evaluate. Anything else I should keep an eye on?
Similar to thoughts in post #51 above, if gauging engine noise is your priority, try depleting the high voltage battery level (left side meter on dash) to <3 bars. If the car doesn't 'naturally' get down to this level while you're driving, select EV mode to preferentially use/drain battery down to this level.

Once the HV battery is that low, any acceleration (with or without hill) will get the gas engine revving because it's both propelling the car and recharging the HV battery. The revving/noise only lasts until the gas engine recharges the HV battery to 4 bars or higher, but will give you a sense for the extent of 'drone' described in online reviews. Try driving on a highway stretch above 70 mph as well, to see what onramp acceleration is like (try with/without sport mode) and how it sounds like when the gas engine runs when directly driving the wheels.

While you're at the dealer, gauge for yourself if you can live with the current fit/finish variations of the Insight - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/313-exterior/2470-fit-finish.html

If you're considering other makes/models, you can also review this "Insight vs Competition" sub-forum for professional reviews and forum member inputs - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/129-2019-honda-insight-versus-competition/
 

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Similar to thoughts in post #51 above, if gauging engine noise is your priority, try depleting the high voltage battery level (left side meter on dash) to <3 bars. If the car doesn't 'naturally' get down to this level while you're driving, select EV mode to preferentially use/drain battery down to this level.

Once the HV battery is that low, any acceleration (with or without hill) will get the gas engine revving because it's both propelling the car and recharging the HV battery. The revving/noise only lasts until the gas engine recharges the HV battery to 4 bars or higher, but will give you a sense for the extent of 'drone' described in online reviews. Try driving on a highway stretch above 70 mph as well, to see what onramp acceleration is like (try with/without sport mode) and how it sounds like when the gas engine runs when directly driving the wheels.

While you're at the dealer, gauge for yourself if you can live with the current fit/finish variations of the Insight - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/313-exterior/2470-fit-finish.html

If you're considering other makes/models, you can also review this "Insight vs Competition" sub-forum for professional reviews and forum member inputs - https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/129-2019-honda-insight-versus-competition/
Adding to @insightfully's advice, to use EV mode to drain the battery, you'll need to keep the power gauge in the blue area. It you exceed it, it will cancel EV mode. It should only take about a mile or so in EV mode to deplete the battery. Once EV mode self-cancels due to low battery, mash the throttle and you'll get the full effect.

I drive conservatively, so I rarely have engine drone. The thing you'll need to get used to (and you will) is the disconnect between the engine sound and what the car is doing. It's unlike any regular non-hybrid car.

Good luck! We're all hoping you choose the Insight!
 

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Having owned the car now for 2 weeks and already closing in on 1k miles, I can say that the droning noise is an easy thing to get used to at least in my opinion. Having a minor noise like this every now and again certainly does not outweigh all the positives this car has brought in my driving life. I guess for me it may be different since I came from a car where the best piece of technology was a 6 disc cd player...so having all these new features really diminishes things such as an infrequent engine noise - especially coming from a particularly loud non-hybrid car previously.

All in all, the car does have an engine noise, yes, but the extent of that noise is really overblown in most reviews that I have read. You'll note that many owners are not bothered by it or get used to it quickly.

Hopefully your second test drive gives you a better idea as to the actual noise inside the cabin. Good luck!
 
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