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Hi all, so I just moved to New England(south NH) so I have yet to replace my tires from when I got the car in the NW. I made it through the unplowed snow we had back west last winter with the stock tires on my EX but that was only 1 week, not months of snow like here. Do I get something all season with the snowflake symbol(Firestone weathergrip) or do I need a dedicated winter tire? The weathergrip seems like a good tire for here but trades some dry performance. I do drive about 100 miles a day so just not sure what I should go with, if I really NEED 2 sets of tires of not
 

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2021 Honda Insight EX - Platinum White Pearl
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If you're that far North and driving that much it's absolutely worth getting dedicated winter tires/wheels. All-weather tires with the snowflake symbol are better than traditional all-seasons, but they're nowhere near as effective as true winter tires. All-Weather Tires Explained: Merging All-Seasons and Winter Tires Sounds like you're going to be spending a lot of time driving in snow/slush and the single most effective piece of safety equipment for winter driving is winter tires. I'm personally a fan of having the winter tires mounted on a second set of inexpensive 15" steel wheels so I can swap the wheels myself twice a year. I got a set of mounted and balanced winter wheels & tires from Tire Rack delivered to my home for under $1000.
 

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Hi all, so I just moved to New England(south NH) so I have yet to replace my tires from when I got the car in the NW. I made it through the unplowed snow we had back west last winter with the stock tires on my EX but that was only 1 week, not months of snow like here. Do I get something all season with the snowflake symbol(Firestone weathergrip) or do I need a dedicated winter tire? The weathergrip seems like a good tire for here but trades some dry performance. I do drive about 100 miles a day so just not sure what I should go with, if I really NEED 2 sets of tires of not
I also live in New England, Maine actually, while I haven't had to drive long distances as of late, I did drive quite a bit for my previous job (different car). I managed just fine with all season tires (Michelin Defender) and those tires are what made me into a Michelin fanboy. While I would not recommend the Defenders for the Insight (they are heavy tires), I think that if most of your travel is on the highway, you will be fine with pretty much any All Season Michelin tire.
 

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I have a different take on this topic.

Just pulling some numbers out of the air, an average driver that puts 10,000 miles on a car per year would reach the end of life of approximately 50,000 miles for an OEM tire after five years. At that point you would need to purchase another set of tires.for the next five years or so of happy driving. My thought is to purchase a set of mounted snow tires when purchasing the car, negotiating this with the dealer if possible. This would mean 100,00 miles of driving split between summer and winter tires over ten years. This still means buying two sets of tires over the life of the car but with the benefits that you get when using snow tires in the winter. Remember, snow tires are not just for getting through ice and snow; the rubber used with snow tires gives you superior grip in temperatures under seven degrees C (44 degrees F). I go through the swap effort for winter to summer to winter driving when it is time for tire rotation so there is no extra penalty for this work and at the same time I avoid skidding into things when the roads are slippery.

My only worry here is the age of the tires at the end of their 100,000 mile life on the car since that would be about ten years. In general it is recommended that tires be considered suspect after about five years of use but so far I have not seen any obvious defects such as cracks in the rubber with my normal practice.
 
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