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Hello, with temps in the low 10°F in New England, there is a lot of ice patches on secondary roads. When accelerating or stopping a little hard, some wheels spin and abruptly stop when traction returns, or the wheels lock when breaking, and it doesn't sound too good.

I'm assuming Hondas are well designed and it's perfectly fine? Or is there a risk of damaging the powertrain and it really should be avoided?
 

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Now you know where "take the car for a spin" comes from.

IMHO the vehicle is fine. Tires are coupled to electric motors and unless your going over ~60mph it isn't directly connected to the gas engine. Spin away...spin away
 

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The real question is are you hearing the ABS system, which is loud and obnoxious?

Because of the nature of electric motors, I'd assume they are brushless style, so the motors are unaffected by torsional forces, and that they have engineered solutions into software/hardware to prevent any major damage.
 

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Hello, with temps in the low 10°F in New England, there is a lot of ice patches on secondary roads. When accelerating or stopping a little hard, some wheels spin and abruptly stop when traction returns, or the wheels lock when breaking, and it doesn't sound too good.

I'm assuming Hondas are well designed and it's perfectly fine? Or is there a risk of damaging the powertrain and it really should be avoided?
I think what you described is exactly how Honda's traction control systems is designed to work (?).

TCS activates when throttle input and engine torque are mismatched. The computer detects whether wheels are slipping, then maintains traction by shifting power to wheels that are still gripping. The powertrain computer reduces engine torque and applies the same electrohydraulic brake actuator and wheel speed sensors as ABS. The re/distribution of this power sounds like what you're describing.

From a description of the traction control system (TCS) in an older Honda/Acura owners manual (which has more detail than our Insight owners manual):
"The TCS monitors the speed of all four wheels. The TCS assists you in maintaining traction while accelerating on slippery surfaces. It does this by regulating the engine's power output when it senses either of the drive wheels starting to spin. When it senses a front wheel losing traction, it applies braking to that wheel. This increases the car's traction and directional stability on loose or slippery road surfaces.

When starting out or driving at low speeds on a loose or slippery road surface, you may notice that the vehicle does not respond to the accelerator in the same way it does at other times. This is a sign the TCS is activating. You will see the TCS indicator light flash when this occurs."
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think what you described is exactly how Honda's traction control systems is designed to work (?).

TCS activates when throttle input and engine torque are mismatched. The computer detects whether wheels are slipping, then maintains traction by shifting power to wheels that are still gripping. The powertrain computer reduces engine torque and applies the same electrohydraulic brake actuator and wheel speed sensors as ABS. The re/distribution of this power sounds like what you're describing.

From a description of the traction control system (TCS) in an older Honda/Acura owners manual (which has more detail than our Insight owners manual):
"The TCS monitors the speed of all four wheels. The TCS assists you in maintaining traction while accelerating on slippery surfaces. It does this by regulating the engine's power output when it senses either of the drive wheels starting to spin. When it senses a front wheel losing traction, it applies braking to that wheel. This increases the car's traction and directional stability on loose or slippery road surfaces.

When starting out or driving at low speeds on a loose or slippery road surface, you may notice that the vehicle does not respond to the accelerator in the same way it does at other times. This is a sign the TCS is activating. You will see the TCS indicator light flash when this occurs."
Absolutely, I'm not saying there is anything wrong with it. It actually works fantastically on snow. But on ice, it's more abrupt, which makes sense, and I just want to be sure it's not increasing wear and tear too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The real question is are you hearing the ABS system, which is loud and obnoxious?

Because of the nature of electric motors, I'd assume they are brushless style, so the motors are unaffected by torsional forces, and that they have engineered solutions into software/hardware to prevent any major damage.
Yes. I will research this brushlessness, sounds interesting.
 

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yes AC asynchronous motor. no brushes like a DC.

there isn't one motor for each wheel. there is a differential like any other car.

This is an older Accord, but is what an Insight is based on:

https://www.marklines.com/en/report_all/rep1259_201402

drivelines are designed to tolerate the dynamic forces of a spinning wheel to a certain degree and traction control prevents them from getting really out of control anyway.

while accelerating it will apply the brake to the fastest wheel(s), and while decelerating it will remove braking from the slowest wheel(s) to keep them all mostly synchronized.
 
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