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I just skimmed the thread, so forgive me if this was discussed earlier but what kind of gas are you using? I've been using a cheap local brand that I think is low quality and suspect it has to do with my inability to crack the low 50 mpgs. I am seriously considering the much more expensive Chevron gas to see what kind of mileage I get. But even if it's an improvement in mileage, it may be a wash in cost.
 

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I just skimmed the thread, so forgive me if this was discussed earlier but what kind of gas are you using? I've been using a cheap local brand that I think is low quality and suspect it has to do with my inability to crack the low 50 mpgs. I am seriously considering the much more expensive Chevron gas to see what kind of mileage I get. But even if it's an improvement in mileage, it may be a wash in cost.
Garbage gas, like "Race Track", will not go the distance. When I drove hundreds of miles a day for work, I tried them all. I found BP and Shell to give me the longest range, and that translated to best MPG. On my 2011 Escape that difference was 200+ miles to 400+ miles. BP was more consistent for best range over Shell. Shell had a bit more power at times, but that didn't translate to better range. Marathon and Valero also do pretty well, as I also tried them towing a loaded trailer and they produced good mileage. After trying several local gas stations last winter (including a local Shell station), I couldn't crack 50 MPG in the 30~40 degree weather. I tried a BP station (25 miles from my home) and immediately obtained 50+ MPG in the same WX conditions. And it was consistently staying in the 50+ MPG range. In optimal WX conditions, that BP gas gets me in the 60+ MPG range with an all time high of 72+ MPG. Also, that BP regular gas happens to be around 50 cents cheaper than the local Shell regular gas, so it's worth it. They say it contains up to 10% ethanol, so my next experiment will be to try non-ethanol gas. I have to look for it, although I expect that to cost way too much to be practical (just an experiment). Being in a boating area, I should be able to find it. Hopefully next weekend I'll need a fillup, but with such good gas mileage I may have to wait two weeks!

Phil
 

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I primarily use Speedway gas (they bought Hess). I didn't go out of my way in choosing Speedway, they just happen to be the most convenient station. I've used "brand X" gas as well. I can't see a difference. In the end, 87 octane is 87 octane.
 

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Garbage gas, like "Race Track", will not go the distance. When I drove hundreds of miles a day for work, I tried them all. I found BP and Shell to give me the longest range, and that translated to best MPG. On my 2011 Escape that difference was 200+ miles to 400+ miles. BP was more consistent for best range over Shell. Shell had a bit more power at times, but that didn't translate to better range. Marathon and Valero also do pretty well, as I also tried them towing a loaded trailer and they produced good mileage. After trying several local gas stations last winter (including a local Shell station), I couldn't crack 50 MPG in the 30~40 degree weather. I tried a BP station (25 miles from my home) and immediately obtained 50+ MPG in the same WX conditions. And it was consistently staying in the 50+ MPG range. In optimal WX conditions, that BP gas gets me in the 60+ MPG range with an all time high of 72+ MPG. Also, that BP regular gas happens to be around 50 cents cheaper than the local Shell regular gas, so it's worth it. They say it contains up to 10% ethanol, so my next experiment will be to try non-ethanol gas. I have to look for it, although I expect that to cost way too much to be practical (just an experiment). Being in a boating area, I should be able to find it. Hopefully next weekend I'll need a fillup, but with such good gas mileage I may have to wait two weeks!

Phil
Most Stewarts have it in the variety of 91 octane. For ethanol free. Just a heads up. Ethanol free should be a 5-10% mpg boost, at the downside of ~20 cents more per gallon than 87.
 

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I just skimmed the thread, so forgive me if this was discussed earlier but what kind of gas are you using? I've been using a cheap local brand that I think is low quality and suspect it has to do with my inability to crack the low 50 mpgs. I am seriously considering the much more expensive Chevron gas to see what kind of mileage I get. But even if it's an improvement in mileage, it may be a wash in cost.
gremal, I see you're also in the SF Bay Area. Where about do you live? In the city of SF. I live in the city and I can't break 49 mpg and I think it's mainly due to the hills. I do occasionally get the 60-70+ mpg on shorter trips where I can use EV more, but it seems the overall still hovers around 49. i might be wrong, but I'm guessing the gents who are getting 50+ mpg during their commutes maybe don't have the hilly city terrain as us in the Bay Area or we're just more of a lead foot :wink:
 

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Regular unleaded, 87 octane or higher is recommended by Honda. Ideally, if your dealer filled the tank as part of the sale, it should be 500+ miles before you'll need to fill up...
 

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The only types of gas I would openly endorse, regular 87 octane. Or the lowest octane ethanol free you can find.

The latter is a more efficient fuel, because Ethanol unless specifically tuned for, produces less energy on combustion than gasoline. That being said, it's a preference type of choice. I believe regular gas works out to 4-5 cents per mile, the ethanol free is in the 5-7 cents per mile. Obviously all gas isn't created the same, all gas has additives, so try to stick to "top tier" fuel. That depends on your locality.

Depending on where you live, ethanol free gas can be 87 octane regular as well (at least the last time I was in Ohio, it was ethanol free, all variants). I believe insightfully has had some good luck with 91 ethanol free, and he is the go to guy on data related to different fuel.
 

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Depending on where you live, ethanol free gas can be 87 octane regular as well (at least the last time I was in Ohio, it was ethanol free, all variants). I believe insightfully has had some good luck with 91 ethanol free, and he is the go to guy on data related to different fuel.

@PHILBERT has more experience with fuel types, including examples woven through threads like these:
https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/266-2019-honda-insight-range-mpge-economy/2480-oddity-freak-unicorn-3.html
https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/266-2019-honda-insight-range-mpge-economy/2082-real-world-2019-insight-mpg-testing-results-13.html#post15746
https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/266-2019-honda-insight-range-mpge-economy/2082-real-world-2019-insight-mpg-testing-results-16.html
https://www.gen3insight.com/forum/137-2019-honda-insight-reviews/2090-2019-insight-0-60-times-inconsistent-amongst-reviews-3.html

I'm the boring one, in that I just stick to Costco top tier 87 octane. :)
 

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Regular unleaded, 87 octane or higher is recommended by Honda. Ideally, if your dealer filled the tank as part of the sale, it should be 500+ miles before you'll need to fill up...
That is, assuming the dealer filled the car fully! Mine shorted me a few gallons on the initial fill.
 

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I've got a question for you longer owners--Honda manual suggests 87 octane for fueling. Is 85 octane okay, do you users using 87 octane get better mileage. I haven't noticed any knocking in my
engine, of course I only have a couple of hundred miles on mine. . .
Thanks!!!!
 

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I've got a question for you longer owners--Honda manual suggests 87 octane for fueling. Is 85 octane okay, do you users using 87 octane get better mileage. I haven't noticed any knocking in my
engine, of course I only have a couple of hundred miles on mine. . .
Thanks!!!!
Didn't even know 85 octane is a thing in the US until you mentioned it...


You have sadly been mislead with every answer to date. You should NOT use 85 or 86 in a car that requires 87, even at higher altitudes.


I just moved from Los Angeles, CA to Denver, CO and have done a lot of research on this.
Basically, 85 and 86 was only ever needed when cars ran on carburetors. The lower octane gas prevented knocking and helped the vehicles run smoother.


Now that 98% of all consumer vehicles do not have carburetors and are, instead, ran using computer-controlled fuel injection systems, the need for 85 and 86 is completely gone. The computers adjust for the altitude and prevent knocking without the need for 85/86. And the reason you want to actually avoid 85 and 86 is that they add significantly more wear and tear to your engine than 87 does. You are essentially damaging your engine by using 85 or 86.


I’ve found that the vast majority of people who live in Denver are under the assumption that 85 and 86 are okay because of the altitude but it’s a case of information being passed down through the decades and nobody questioning it. Everyone assumes that what was good for vehicles several decades ago, must still be good for them but engines have advanced so much that this is a very silly logical fallacy.


Also at play is confirmation bias and other cognitive biases…basically people don’t want to do the research to find out that they, A) have been putting gas in their vehicles that is actually damaging their engines and, B) should start paying for and using “mid-grade” (which is actually just standard in the rest of the country). People have structured their money and lives around paying for this really cheap, really bad gas, so banning 85 and 86 would be akin to the government making cigarettes illegal. People would lose their **** minds.
https://www.quora.com/Denver-CO-Is-it-safe-for-your-car-to-use-85-octane-gasoline-at-high-altitude-if-the-manufacturers-manual-states-it-requires-87-octane-minimum
^What I found about 85 octane gas via Quora.


I would use what Honda suggests in the manual unless you want to give them a reason to void your warranty.
 

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Part of that doesn't sound right. HIGHER octane protects against knocking (preignition of the compressed fuel/air), not lower, at least in modern engines.
 

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I agree with JK919!. I live in Virginia and have never seen 85 octane gas. In my 50 years of driving, all I have seen here is 87, 89, 92 or 93 octane. Years ago, I had a vehicle that would "ping" or knock with 87 octane and I put 89 mid-grade octaane in which stopped the knocking.
 
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